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  1. SunMoon's Avatar

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
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    #1

    Question Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    I am using the verb 'tailor' and would like to know if I am using it correctly.

    I have implemented IT systems tailored on business requirements and operational needs.

    Is it correct to use 'on' after 'tailored'?


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #2

    Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    It's 'tailored to"

    Would not "customized for business requirements..." be better, since we are talking computer systems here?

    Can anyone in the IT field/computer industry say what the preferred lingo is?

    customize: modify (something) to suit a particular individual or task

  2. Monticello's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by SunMoon View Post
    I am using the verb 'tailor' and would like to know if I am using it correctly.

    I have implemented IT systems tailored on business requirements and operational needs.

    Is it correct to use 'on' after 'tailored'?
    Hi SunMoon,

    In terms of the overall effectiveness of your sentence, I'm not too keen on the choice of the word "implement(ed)"-- here being used as a verb. -It definitely has a "business speak" sense about it, so, of course, it's not out of place. It's just that, being so over-used in business writing, its impact on the page of a C.V. is one of "dead on arrival."

    Why not consider being more specific here? : -designed, developed, and maintained. Have you done all three? - Then put them to work:
    - designed, developed, and maintained IT systems ...
    I also have a reservation about the redundancy of " ... requirements ... needs ..." After all, aren't they one and the same thing? -Then why not get rid of one? :
    - designed, developed, and maintained IT systems, with a special focus upon the business and operational requirements within the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC).
    -Best of luck to you

    (My work history includes more than a few years as a software engineer.)
    Last edited by Monticello; 13-Mar-2009 at 03:49.

  3. SunMoon's Avatar

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    #4

    Thumbs up Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi SunMoon,

    In terms of the overall effectiveness of your sentence, I'm not too keen on the choice of the word "implement(ed)"-- here being used as a verb. -It definitely has a "business speak" sense about it, so, of course, it's not out of place. It's just that, being so over-used in business writing, its impact on the page of a C.V. is one of "dead on arrival."

    Why not consider being more specific here? : -designed, developed, and maintained. Have you done all three? - Then put them to work:
    - designed, developed, and maintained IT systems ...
    I also have a reservation about the redundancy of " ... requirements ... needs ..." After all, aren't they one and the same thing? -Then why not get rid of one? :
    - designed, developed, and maintained IT systems, with a special focus upon the business and operational requirements within the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC).
    -Best of luck to you

    (My work history includes more than a few years as a software engineer.)
    Many thanks to Monticello and David, I really appreciated your useful support, indeed!

    In answer to some questions, yes, Monticello you are right about the use of 'implemented' which is over used. Although there are two aspects which moved me to use that; one is I already used the verbs 'designed, outlined, developed and managed' in other parts of the same cover letter so I used 'implemented' to avoid redundancies, and the other aspect is that recruiters some times are very young and they look for the exactly terms used in the advertisement. It seems strange but if you do not use those terms they believe you do not have the right experience.

    Anyway, I like very much the sentence you have suggested above.

    Many thanks and when I will catch up the job opportunity I am looking for I will offer a drink to all...!!!

    To the next!

    PS: Any correction on my writings will be very appreciated...


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #5

    Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    Programmers are a form of engineer. They rank each other by skills and knowledge. All managers are seen as hopeless retards, who don't have a clue. It is the respect of their peers that is sought.

    When a programmer 'customizes' software, he takes an existing body of code and tweaks it for the client. Maybe changes the colours and logos, add a new dialogue etc. This is very easy to do and requires little skill. Thus saying this earns you little respect in the technical world. It would be like applying to a top chef and saying you had flipped burgers.

    What each programmer wants to do is proclaim his achievements, to show that he is written the most complex software in all manner of fields. This earns the respect of the other engineers and gets him the interview.

    I have implemented IT systems tailored on business requirements and operational needs.
    Of course the word would be 'to' here.

    The tailoring theme is often used. Frequently this is described as 'bespoke' software development. Its a theme engineers like, it makes them a craftsman instead of an automaton following a set of rules. The guy that has served his carpentry apprentice is better than a guy who who knows how to use a saw.

    The word implementation is frequently used, of course you implement a plan. This is how most IT professionals work. The managers keep them away from the end users. This ensures that they don't cut the managers out of the loop thus making them redundant. The specifications given are always hopelessly vague, but the programmer gets the idea of what is wanted. He then goes away and produces what he thinks the client wants, clarifying any ambiguities.

    Of course, all such software is to meet business requirements and operational needs. Thus it need not be stated. What the candidate is trying to do is suggest he is a responsive to their needs and not off living in the software land, where programmers tend to live, wanting to produce interesting code, but of no business use.

  4. Monticello's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    HI thod00,

    Are you so sure that you can extrapolate your own work experiences as a programmer to the entirety of the software development business world?

    I find your hubris -- especially the “flipped burgers” and “Top Chef” parallels -- thoroughly amusing. (Perhaps you are watching more than your fair share of cable cooking channels?)
    "Of course, all such software is to meet business requirements and operational needs. Thus it need not be stated."
    Here again, your words appear to betray a very limited scope of experience. My suggestion for improving SunMoon’s one line CV statement was not just limited to “business and operational requirements,” but as you may recall, “business and operational requirements within the System Development Life Cycle (SDLC)." – just a bit of difference. Isn’t there? Thus, my recommendation that "business and operational requirements" in fact be stated in this much broader context.

    When you write your own C.V., or advise others about the same, perhaps it wouldn’t hurt to extend your view to the “big picture.”

    -All the best
    Last edited by Monticello; 18-Mar-2009 at 02:43.


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #7

    Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    Are you so sure that you can extrapolate your own work experiences as a programmer to the entirety of the software development business world?


    Hmm, 10 years in permanent jobs, then 15 years as a contractor. Worked in small development shops, large corporates, the banks in London, R&D departments. Developed the biggest web sites, driver and kernel hacks back when we still had to do that in Unix, databases, you name it I have done it.

    So yea, I have wider experience of the software world than almost anyone.

    Here again, your words appear to betray a very limited scope of experience.


    As a contractor you live or die by your skills and experience.
    You get to know a thing or two after your hundredth interview, you know how to write a CV to get that interview because you get a new job every 6 months or so.

    When you write your own C.V., or advise others about the same, perhaps it wouldn’t hurt to extend your view to the “big picture.”


    Perhaps you are teaching your grandmother to suck eggs. I have been doing this for many decades, for a living, where many fail. I have made so much money from it I can sit here now and not need to work again while fending off the job offers. Perhaps that means I really suck at it.

  5. Monticello's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Systems tailored on requirements... please, is it correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by thod00 View Post
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    Hmm, 10 years in permanent jobs, then 15 years as a contractor. Worked in small development shops, large corporates, the banks in London, R&D departments. Developed the biggest web sites, driver and kernel hacks back when we still had to do that in Unix, databases, you name it I have done it.

    So yea, I have wider experience of the software world than almost anyone.



    As a contractor you live or die by your skills and experience. You get to know a thing or two after your hundredth interview, you know how to write a CV to get that interview because you get a new job every 6 months or so.



    Perhaps you are teaching your grandmother to suck eggs. I have been doing this for many decades, for a living, where many fail. I have made so much money from it I can sit here now and not need to work again while fending off the job offers. Perhaps that means I really suck at it.
    Hi thod00,

    With all due respect, my previous post never once questioned your programming abilities or the length of your experience. (Please take the time to reread it.) - just your glib self-assurances that this work experience could be "extrapolat[ed] ... to the entirety of the software development business world."

    Concerning your work experiences as a programmer: You certainly have my sympathies. From your own account it would appear that, from where you hail, "programmers" are regarded more as "tradespeople" than professionals.

    As for either of my grandmothers or what I could ever have taught them while they were here upon this earth (God bless the memory of their souls), your statement is merely a true reflection of your own character and judgment. Why take the issues off-point with an ad hominem such as you offer above? Can statements such as these ever show any strength to your thinking?

    -All the best.

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