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    #1

    shaken in anger or shaken with anger?

    Dear teachers,

    Here are a few sentences written by two two different authors.

    1. When a child is shaken in anger and frustration, the force is multiplied five or 10 times than it would be if the child had simply tripped and fallen.
    2. The father was shaken with anger when he learned that his son had run into debt.
    Would you be kind enough to tell me which one is written properly? The former or latter?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Re: shaken in anger or shaken with anger?

    The second example is correct, but the first one should read: When a child is shaking in anger and frustration.....

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    #3

    Re: shaken in anger or shaken with anger?

    Quote Originally Posted by redcrows View Post
    The second example is correct, but the first one should read: When a child is shaking in anger and frustration.....

    Being "shaken in anger" is a term used to explain an injury to a child, as in "shaken baby syndrome" That is what is meant by the force being greater than if the child had only fallen.

    If a child is angry himself/herself, I think the term should be "shaking with anger and frustration."

    In the second sentence, I think also that it should be "shaking with anger."

    I am not a teacher.

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    #4

    Re: shaken in anger or shaken with anger?

    Dear vil:

    'Shaken in anger':

    The child had been shaken in anger by his babysitter.
    This means the babysitter became so angry that s/he shook the child. (Grasped the child firmly and jerked her/his body back and forth rapidly)

    The father was shaken with anger when he learned that his son had run into debt.
    'To be shaken' in this sense means to be profoundly disturbed by something. This makes the construction of the example sentence unusual. One would usually hear, in a case like this:
    The father was shaking with anger when ...

    Shaken:

    William's faith in God was deeply shaken after the destruction of his town by an earthquake.

    My sense of safety was shaken when I was attacked on the street.

    I hope this is useful,

    Petra

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