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    #1

    Perfect Continuous Infinitive

    Dear teachers,

    I have a notion about the Indefinite Infinitive (active) and the Perfect Infinitive (active)

    I am glad to see you.
    I am glad to have seen him.

    I have also a notion about the Indefinite Infinitive (passive) and the Perfect Infinitive (passive)
    I am glad to be given a ticket for this concert.
    I am glad to have been given a ticket for this concert.

    I know something about the usage of the Continuous Infinitive and the Perfect Continuous Infinitive.

    He is glad to be reading this novel.
    He is glad to have been living in England.

    I know also something about the Perfect Continuous Infinitive.

    I am happy to have been working at the hospital all these years.
    I remember to have been working at that hospital all those years before entering the University.

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me how the used above both similarly grammar combination of the Perfect Continuous Infinitive in the last two sentences express as a matter of fact two different real times?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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    #2

    Re: Perfect Continuous Infinitive

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    I have a notion about the Indefinite Infinitive (active) and the Perfect Infinitive (active)

    I am glad to see you.
    I am glad to have seen him.

    I have also a notion about the Indefinite Infinitive (passive) and the Perfect Infinitive (passive)
    I am glad to be given a ticket for this concert.
    I am glad to have been given a ticket for this concert.

    I know something about the usage of the Continuous Infinitive and the Perfect Continuous Infinitive.

    He is glad to be reading this novel.
    He is glad to have been living in England when he was at school.

    I know also something about the Perfect Continuous Infinitive.

    I am happy to have been working at the hospital all these years.
    I remember to have been working at that hospital all those years before entering the University.

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me how the used above both similarly grammar combination of the Perfect Continuous Infinitive in the last two sentences express as a matter of fact two different real times?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Dear vil:

    Sidestepping the issue of what these tenses are called:

    I am happy to have been working at the hospital all these years.
    I keep going back and forth on this sentence. Is it natural? Is it not? I think I'm concentrating on it too hard, making it sound slightly awkward. I hope others will reply, so you can get some perspective on it.

    I am happy to have been working at the hospital all these years.
    or:
    I am happy to have worked at the hospital all these years.
    I am happy to have been employed at the hospital all these years.
    I am happy to have had the opportunity of working at the hospital all these years.

    Time sense/meaning:
    I have worked at the hospital for x years. I still work there, or maybe I'm speaking at my retirement party. I am happy about it.


    I remember to have been working at that hospital all those years before entering the University.
    This sentence doesn't work. It does have a sort of abstract logical possibility, but it would sound odd to a native speaker.

    It is trying to say: I remember the many years I worked at the hospital. I do not work there now. I have not worked there since I entered the University.

    I remember to have been working at that hospital all those years before entering the University.
    I remember that I worked at that hospital all those years before entering the University.
    I remember that I had been working at the hospital for six months when I met you.
    I remember that to have been working at that hospital all those years before entering the University was wonderful preparation for my work as a doctor.
    When the phrase to have been working appears in a sentence, the reader/listener will expect to hear more information related to it:
    To have been working at that hospital all those years before entering the University was a privilege.or is something that would never be possible today.

    Different interpretation
    I remember working at that hospital all those years ago, before entering the University. Different meaning than the example. Refers to how many years ago, rather than how many years spent working.

    I hope this is useful,

    Petra

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