Results 1 to 3 of 3

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    An idiom in passive voice?

    Sir,
    To turn the tables is an idiom which carries the meaning "to change the situation drastically in one's favour."
    My querry is that whether I can use the passive voice of the same with the same meaning or not? e.g.

    India was almost losing the match but Sachin came and turned the tables.

    Passive Voice : The tables were turned by Sachin.
    Is it correct and conveying the desired meaning now?

  1. Snowcake's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 624
    #2

    Re: An idiom in passive voice?

    Quote Originally Posted by ANAND PENDSE View Post
    Sir,
    To turn the tables is an idiom which carries the meaning "to change the situation drastically in one's favour."
    My querry is that whether I can use the passive voice of the same with the same meaning or not? e.g.

    India was almost losing the match but Sachin came and turned the tables.

    Passive Voice : The tables were turned by Sachin.
    Is it correct and conveying the desired meaning now?
    Grammatically correct, but the active voice in your example builds up the suspense whereas the passive voice might sound a bit stilted. It depends on what you wish to stress. The doer of the action (Sacchin) or the action itself?

    Better:
    The tables were turned in the second half, when Sacchin ...

    See here Passive Voice

  2. stuartnz's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • New Zealand

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,370
    #3

    Re: An idiom in passive voice?

    Quote Originally Posted by ANAND PENDSE View Post
    Sir,
    To turn the tables is an idiom which carries the meaning "to change the situation drastically in one's favour."
    My querry is that whether I can use the passive voice of the same with the same meaning or not? e.g.

    India was almost losing the match but Sachin came and turned the tables.

    Passive Voice : The tables were turned by Sachin.
    Is it correct and conveying the desired meaning now?

    I am not a professional teacher, but I am hoping to see Sachin soon in what will probably be his last Test Series here in NZ. To use that idiom in the passive voice I would say something like "then Sachin came to the wicket and the tables were turned. "

    For an interesting article on the passive voice, including the shift in the meaning of the term, you might enjoy reading this:

    "Passive Voice" 1397-2009 R.I.P.

Similar Threads

  1. [Idiom] Idioms quiz
    By daria28 in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28-Jan-2009, 09:02
  2. [Grammar] A problem when changing the active voice into passive voice
    By imme9x in forum Frequently Asked Questions
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 16-Dec-2008, 10:21
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Dec-2008, 14:28
  4. What is different between perfect tense and passive voice?
    By callonghouse in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2006, 04:13
  5. organization
    By Aldana in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Dec-2005, 11:20

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •