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  1. phorntita's Avatar
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    #1

    "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    Lately I've to give an example (a sentence)to one of my idiom in my monthly article of our office monthly magazine I came across the difference between the word "meaning" and "meaningful" in the use of English: I'm not sure which word I should use in this sentence What's so _______________ to me is to be a tutor;the relatively high fee than ever is the icing on the cake . (meaning,meaningful) Could anyone tell me, and what part of speech is it?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    "meaningful". It's an adjective. In this context it seems to mean 'giving my life meaning'.

    Incidentally, 'relatively high fee than ever' doesn't make sense.

    b

  3. phorntita's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    Dear BobK (moderator)
    Sometimes I'm confused about how to choose the words used in the sentences (collocation). The reason is that English isn't my first language and when it's time to create a new sentence, I may have a chance to convey my understanding from my first language to English directly and make many mistakes accordingly. So, when you advise me that it doesn't make any sense in the part of :the relatively high fee than ever = then
    How can I change this part in the sense of= the fee I receive this time is rather high than I've ever got in the past
    Actually I've to pass my draft about this article for publishing tomorrow.
    So,would you be so kind as to reply me ASAP


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    #4

    Re: "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    What's so meaningful to me is the help I'm able to give in my work as a tutor. That, in return, I am receiving my highest remuneration ever is the icing on the cake!

    remuneration :money paid for work or a service. (A nice way of saying salary, or wages.)

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    Note 'highest' - superlative. 'Relatively' suggests a comparison. (I wasn't being deliberately unhelpful, I just wasn't sure what you meant. )

    b

  5. phorntita's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    So,my BObK moderator, What is your suggestion? anyway. What is the full sentences you'll show me for this example?. I'll be waiting for your answer right here right now.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "meaning & meaningful" Which word is better?

    The sign was to show that I agreed with this:
    That, in return, I am receiving my highest remuneration ever is the icing on the cake!
    The inversion (starting with the subordinate clause) wouldn't have been my choice. I'd have said 'The icing on the the cake is that, in return, I am receiving my highest remuneration ever'. But the extra money, although it's in the subordinate clause, may be uppermost in your mind - which would explain David's choice. To make the grammar match these priorities (main clause - money; subordinate clause - icing) you could also say:

    "And in return I'm receiving my highest remuneration ever - which is the icing on the cake!"

    b

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