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  1. PLop
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    #1

    bail on-stand up

    Hello teachers,

    I have a question about the phrasal verb 'to bail on someone'
    I wonder if it means to describe someone backs out from a plan, like in this conversation:

    A: Well, I'm sorry B.I don't think I can go to C's place this weekend.Something came up.
    B: Oh no!Don't you dare BAIL ON me. We've already planned everything...What am I to do without you?
    A: Perhaps it's better if I'm not around, don't you think?
    I'm truly sorry that I have to BAIL on you.

    I wonder if the verb is correctly applied in the sentences. Any comments?
    Besides that, I want to know if I can use the phrasal verb ' to stand someone up' in lieu of 'to bail on someone'


    Do they have the same meaning?
    Are they interchangeable?If they aren't, do you have any examples to show the difference usage?

    thank you!

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bail on-stand up

    To "bail" means to leave. To "bail on" means to back out of something previously planned or to let someone down.

    Examples:
    "Are you leaving so soon? We're just starting to have fun."
    "Yeah, I know it's early, but I've got to bail. I promised my wife I'd be home for dinner."


    "I know I promised to pick your in-laws up at the airport tomorrow, but my boss just told me I have to work all day tomorrow."
    "Oh, don't bail on me now, I can't leave them stranded at the airport!"
    "I'm sorry, but there's nothing I can do about it."

  3. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jan 2009
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    #3

    Re: bail on-stand up

    Quote Originally Posted by PLop View Post
    Hello teachers,

    I have a question about the phrasal verb 'to bail on someone'
    I wonder if it means to describe someone backs out from a plan, like in this conversation:

    A: Well, I'm sorry B.I don't think I can go to C's place this weekend.Something came up.
    B: Oh no!Don't you dare BAIL ON me. We've already planned everything...What am I to do without you?
    A: Perhaps it's better if I'm not around, don't you think?
    I'm truly sorry that I have to BAIL on you.

    I wonder if the verb is correctly applied in the sentences. Any comments?
    Besides that, I want to know if I can use the phrasal verb ' to stand someone up' in lieu of 'to bail on someone'


    Do they have the same meaning?
    Are they interchangeable?If they aren't, do you have any examples to show the difference usage?

    thank you!
    To bail on = to desert. I'm bailing on you = I'm deserting you.

    It comes from the expression "bail out," which means, among other things, "jump out" (of an airplane before it crashes).

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