Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
    • Posts: 575
    #1

    ing

    I would like to know the difference between complaining(1) and complaining(2) in grammar.
    1. Stop complaining.
    2. They've got a nerve, complaining about our behaviour.

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between complaining(1) and complaining(2) in grammar.
    1. Stop complaining.
    2. They've got a nerve, complaining about our behaviour.
    1. 'Stop' functions as a verb. Its object is the noun 'complaining'.

    2. The phrase 'complaining about our behavior' functions as an adverb. It answers the question, "Why do they have nerve?" (Answer: ... because they are complaining about our behavior); 'complaining' is a present participle.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #3

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between complaining(1) and complaining(2) in grammar.
    1. Stop complaining.
    2. They've got a nerve, complaining about our behaviour.
    'Stop complaining' can also be viewed as a phasal (aspective) predicate, consisting of a structural element and a notional one. The structural element is expressed by the phasal verb 'stop' which indicates the cessation of the action, and the notional element is expressed by the gerund 'complaining'.

    BTW, 'complaining' in the second sentence is present participle.

  2. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #4

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    'Stop complaining' can also be viewed as a phasal (aspective) predicate, consisting of a structural element and a notional one. The structural element is expressed by the phasal verb 'stop' which indicates the cessation of the action, and the notional element is expressed by the gerund 'complaining'.

    BTW, 'complaining' in the second sentence is present participle.
    So, we're saying the same thing, right?

    In 1. complaining functions as a noun. (Psst, -ing nouns are gerunds.)


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #5

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    So, we're saying the same thing, right?

    In 1. complaining functions as a noun. (Psst, -ing nouns are gerunds.)
    Yes, absolutely. It just depends on what you consider 'stop' to be - an independent verb or an element of a bigger structure.
    In some sentences there is no alternative:
    On our way to the city we stopped at a little cafe.
    However, when 'stop' is followed by a gerund, there is a tendency to qualify it as structural part of an aspective predicate.

  3. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #6

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Yes, absolutely. It just depends on what you consider 'stop' to be - an independent verb or an element of a bigger structure.
    In some sentences there is no alternative:
    On our way to the city we stopped at a little cafe.
    However, when 'stop' is followed by a gerund, there is a tendency to qualify it as structural part of an aspective predicate.
    True; however, it's still a noun at the basic level of its grammatical structure. Predicated or not, it's a noun in form and function.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #7

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    True; however, it's still a noun at the basic level of its grammatical structure. Predicated or not, it's a noun in form and function.
    You mean the gerund 'complaining' that follows it?

    There are nouns that indicate a process. Those nouns are similar in meaning to gerunds. However a gerund presents a process dynamically, in its development, and a noun does it statically, as a fact.

    e.g. to stop discussing a project
    to stop the discussion of a project
    Last edited by Clark; 24-Mar-2009 at 13:24.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #8

    Re: ing

    This is why I still believe in the old fashioned distinction between gerunds and gerundives.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #9

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    This is why I still believe in the old fashioned distinction between gerunds and gerundives.
    Never heard of the latter. What is it?

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #10

    Re: ing

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Never heard of the latter. What is it?
    It's a matter of debate:

    David Field: The English Gerundive

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •