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    #1

    you bet....

    I heard frequently in the conversation of movies saying, "you bet"

    1) What are the meanings and usage of "you bet"

    2) Is "you bet" a polite expression?

    3) Can we use "you bet' in writing?


    Thanks / ju

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: you bet....

    It's an informal confirmation of strong agreement: 'You [can] bet [that I'm in complete agreement with you]'. Agatha Christie used it as a clue (in Murder on the Orient Express) that the person who used it had spent time in the USA. But the expression is widely used in the UK too today.

    I wouldn't say it was impolite, but it is informal, and not usually seen in writing,

    b

    PS An equivalent - again spreading from American to Br English - is 'Sure'. In the spoken form /ʃə(r)/ it sounds rather like a Chinese expression of agreement (I don't know how to write it. but I've heard it in films like Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. I suspect (this is my own Wild-Assed Guess, so don't go adding it to Wikipedia ) that 'Sure' was popularized in American English by Chinese immigrants because it sounded familiar, and was then reclaimed from Chinese by the addition of the second word in 'Sure thing').
    Last edited by BobK; 23-Mar-2009 at 15:47. Reason: PS added

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    #3

    Re: you bet....

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It's an informal confirmation of strong agreement: 'You [can] bet [that I'm in complete agreement with you]'. Agatha Christie used it as a clue (in Murder on the Orient Express) that the person who used it had spent time in the USA. But the expression is widely used in the UK too today.

    I wouldn't say it was impolite, but it is informal, and not usually seen in writing,

    b

    PS An equivalent - again spreading from American to Br English - is 'Sure'. In the spoken form /ʃə(r)/ it sounds rather like a Chinese expression of agreement (I don't know how to write it. but I've heard it in films like Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon. I suspect (this is my own Wild-Assed Guess, so don't go adding it to Wikipedia ) that 'Sure' was popularized in American English by Chinese immigrants because it sounded familiar, and was then reclaimed from Chinese by the addition of the second word in 'Sure thing').


    1) May I reply like this during an conversation as follow?

    Tim said, "Would you like to have a drink after work today?"
    I reply, "You bet."


    2) What is the meaning and usage of 'sure thing'


    Thanks/ ju

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: you bet....

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post


    1) May I reply like this during an conversation as follow?

    Tim said, "Would you like to have a drink after work today?"
    I reply, "You bet."
    It's a reinforcer. 'Yes, Id like that very much'.

    2) What is the meaning and usage of 'sure thing'


    Thanks/ ju
    There are two main uses of 'sure thing', but only one as an expression on its own:
    Tim said, "Would you like to have a drink after work today?"
    I reply, "Sure thing." ('Sure' would work here, and so would 'You bet').

    (The other use is as a plain noun phrase: 'It's a sure thing that the election of Obama will <insert-your-political-belief-here>')


    b

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    #5

    Re: you bet....

    It is informal, but not impolite, in AE, as Americans view modesty, friendliness and warmth as preferable modes of politeness, whereas Europeans view respect and decorum as much more important.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: you bet....

    PS Last Night, on the American TV series CSI, I heard it used not so much as an expression of enthusiastic agreement ('Want a drink?'/'You bet') but just as a form of acknowledgement: 'Thanks, that really saved my life.'/'You bet - I would've done the same for anyone'. (In Br Eng the equivalent would be 'Don't mention it').

    b

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    #7

    Re: you bet....

    Well we use it to express total certainty, even enthusiasm; here it did not quite mean don't mention it, I feel. But they're compatible.

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: you bet....

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Well we use it to express total certainty, even enthusiasm; here it did not quite mean don't mention it, I feel. But they're compatible.
    Yes, it struck me as odd. In Br Eng 'Sure thing' expresses strong agreement. But in the CSI case I mentioned it was more like 'Don't mention it' or 'No problem' or 'Not at all' (that's 'not at all' in the 'Don't mention it' sense - not at all the same as the strong disagreement sense [I sure am glad I don't have to learn this stuff!])

    b

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