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    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Fossilization/Plateaus

    Hi,
    I am currently doing a seminar paper on the aspect of fossilization (when a learner of English is effectively "stuck" at a particular level and it seems can not (or will not?) improve or keeps making the same errors despite error correction, learning the correct form, speaking English every day, being surrounded by English etc etc).
    In my paper, I need to discuss the reasons for fossilization, but more importantly, discuss how tutors can overcome this. I would really like to hear from any tutors who have encountered this problem and whether they could throw any light on how to deal with it.

    Thanks


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 139
    #2

    Re: Fossilization/Plateaus

    Should I know more about this ?
    Best Regards,
    Mauricio

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: Fossilization/Plateaus

    Quote Originally Posted by Cemmolloy View Post
    Hi,
    I am currently doing a seminar paper on the aspect of fossilization (when a learner of English is effectively "stuck" at a particular level and it seems can not (or will not?) improve or keeps making the same errors despite error correction, learning the correct form, speaking English every day, being surrounded by English etc etc).
    In my paper, I need to discuss the reasons for fossilization, but more importantly, discuss how tutors can overcome this. I would really like to hear from any tutors who have encountered this problem and whether they could throw any light on how to deal with it.

    Thanks
    Not advice, but a question: is 'fossilization' the best word? In discussions of language, people usually use 'fossil' to refer to an old form preserved in a modern expression. For example, the word 'nonce' contains a fossil of the Old English dative ending - it's used for a word made up for then ones; or 'porpoise' contains a fossil of the nominative pois in Old French - so that it means 'pig-fish').

    How about 'ossification', or - from developmental psychology - 'arrested development'?

    b

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