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    #1

    UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Dear Teachers and forum members,

    The list is not exhaustive. You're welcome to make the contribution. Let me kick it off first:

    1. 26/12/2009(UK)/12/26/2009(USA)
    2. 26th December(UK)/December 26th
    3. One hundred and fifty(UK)/One hundre fifty(USA)
    4. in the street/avenue(UK)/on the street/avenue(USA)
    5. on the weekend, on weekends(UK)/at the weekend, at weekends (USA)
    6. around/round the corner(UK)/round the corner(USA)
    7. towards/toward the river(UK)/toward the river(USA)
    8. in hospital (for treatment)(UK)/in the hospital(for treatment)(USA)
    9. play the piano(UK)/play piano(USA)
    10. somewhere(UK)/someplace/anywhere, no place(USA)
    11. I do not have/haven't time to attend(UK)/I do not have time to attend(USA)
    12. I do not need/needn"t the money(UK)/I do not need the money(USA)
    13. He suggests that she seeks the advice of the professor/He suggests that she (should) seek the advice of the professor (UK)/He suggests that she seek the advice of the professor(USA)
    14. different from/to(UK)/different from/than(USA)
    15. has/have already/yet/just +past participle(UK)/has/have already/yet/just +past participle OR already/yet/just + past tense (USA)
    16. Has she+ EVER +past participle...?(UK)/ Did she EVER ... (past tense)?(USA)
    17. We will/shall (UK)/We will (USA)(Future Tense)
    18. Shall we...(Suggestion)(UK)/Should we...(USA)
    19. travelled(UK)/traveled(USA)
    20. organise(UK)/organze(USA)
    21. flavour/honour(UK)/flavor/honor(USA)


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    #2

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    4. in the street/avenue(UK)/on the street/avenue(USA)
    Brit. Eng. uses both, and distinguishes between when we say 'in the street' and when 'on the street'.

  1. Monticello's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Hi albertino,

    As an American, may I suggest some updates to your list?

    4.in/on the street/avenue(USA) (Both are used and each has a different meaning.)
    5. on/over the weekend, on weekends (USA) (I've never heard at the weekend.)
    6. around/round the corner(USA) (Both are used and have the same meaning.)
    7. towards/toward the river(USA) (Both are used and have the same meaning.)
    9. play the piano/play piano(USA) (Both are common.)
    10. somewhere/someplace/anywhere, no place(USA) (All are common.)
    14. different from/than(USA) (Though you occasionally will hear different than, it is an incorrect collocation.)
    16. Has she+ EVER +past participle...? Did she EVER ... (present tense)(USA) (Both are quite common. Please note: The construction, Did s/he ever ... (past tense)??? is incorrect and would sound very strange to the typical American ear.)
    17. We will/shall (USA)(Future Tense) (Both are used; we shall is now less common, probably due to its more formal tone.)
    19. travelled/traveled(USA) (As with judgement/judgment, Both are accepted and commonly used.)
    Last edited by Monticello; 26-Mar-2009 at 08:53.

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    #4

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Want/need + -ing (with a passive meaning) (UK)
    The windows need cleaning.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    You have "on the weekend" and "at the weekend" backwards. BE says "at" and AE "on."

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    #6

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Regardin 12, would anyone in the UK really say "I needn't the money"?

    I've heard "You needn't [do x]" where we would be more likely to say "You don't need to [do X]" but never "I needn't the salt - the eggs are fine they way they are."

    In the US, we do say "Shall we..." -- it's probably the last use of "shall."

  4. Charlie Bernstein's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by albertino View Post
    Dear Teachers and forum members,

    The list is not exhaustive. You're welcome to make the contribution. Let me kick it off first:

    1. 26/12/2009(UK)/12/26/2009(USA)
    2. 26th December(UK)/December 26th
    3. One hundred and fifty(UK)/One hundre fifty(USA) We say both.
    4. in the street/avenue(UK)/on the street/avenue(USA)
    5. on the weekend, on weekends(UK)/at the weekend, at weekends (USA) No, we say "on the weekend," too.
    6. around/round the corner(UK)/round the corner(USA)
    No, we say "around." Some say "'round," but note the apostrophe, because "'round" is nonstandard.
    7. towards/toward the river(UK)/toward the river(USA)
    We say both "toward" and "towards."
    8. in hospital (for treatment)(UK)/in the hospital(for treatment)(USA)
    9. play the piano(UK)/play piano(USA) We say both.
    10. somewhere(UK)/someplace/anywhere, no place(USA) We say all four.
    11. I do not have/haven't time to attend(UK)/I do not have time to attend(USA) We usually say "I don't have time," but all are fine.
    12. I do not need/needn"t the money(UK)/I do not need the money(USA)
    We usually say "I don't need," but all are fine.
    13. He suggests that she seeks the advice of the professor/He suggests that she (should) seek the advice of the professor (UK)/He suggests that she seek the advice of the professor(USA)
    14. different from/to(UK)/different from/than(USA)
    15. has/have already/yet/just +past participle(UK)/has/have already/yet/just +past participle OR already/yet/just + past tense (USA)
    16. Has she+ EVER +past participle...?(UK)/ Did she EVER ... (past tense)?(USA) We say both.
    17. We will/shall (UK)/We will (USA)(Future Tense)
    18. Shall we...(Suggestion)(UK)/Should we...(USA)
    19. travelled(UK)/traveled(USA)
    20. organise(UK)/organze(USA)
    21. flavour/honour(UK)/flavor/honor(USA)
    Just to keep the record straight.

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Also, spelling differences may be regarded as not related to the grammar of the language, as they are arbitrary, whereas language usage differences are not.

  6. Monticello's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Bernstein
    6. around/round the corner(UK)/round the corner(USA) No, we say "around." Some say "'round," but note the apostrophe, because "'round" is nonstandard.
    Hmmm ...
    And what rough beast, its hour come round at last,
    Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

    - William Butler Yeats, from his poem, The Second Coming
    Yes, I know, Yeats was Irish, as well as partly of British descent. So maybe it's just the Irish in me that finds the word round (please note: no apostrophe) as an acceptable (though admittedly, rarely used) American synonym for the word around?

    Let's check a reliable source to either confirm or deny: The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (Fourth Edition), and its entry for round.

    Click on the link, page down, and, sure enough there you'll find:

    PREPOSITION:1. Around. 2. From the beginning to the end of; throughout: a plant that grows round the year.


    What rough beast? - Indeed.

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    #10

    Re: UK Grammar vs USA Grammar

    And lest we not forget our (American) history, please see the link below:

    The Battle at Lexington Green, 1775: "The shot heard round the world."

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