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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
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    #1

    set to dock with space station

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the usage of the phrasal verb “set to” in combination with “with”?

    Here are two sentences, the former from a Russian source and the latter from one of the USA

    Russian rocket set to dock with space station on Saturday. (the Internet Television station “Russia today”)

    After a busy first day in orbit inspecting heat shields, Discovery's seven astronauts today are set to dock with the International Space Station. (the article “Shuttle set to dock with Space Station”)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #2

    Re: set to dock with space station

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the usage of the phrasal verb “set to” in combination with “with”?

    Here are two sentences, the former from a Russian source and the latter from one of the USA

    Russian rocket set to dock with space station on Saturday. (the Internet Television station “Russia today”)

    After a busy first day in orbit inspecting heat shields, Discovery's seven astronauts today are set to dock with the International Space Station. (the article “Shuttle set to dock with Space Station”)

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    (T)o set to dock is a verb phrase. When something sets to dock with a station, a space craft or whatever attaches itself to a station.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #3

    Re: set to dock with space station

    'set to' in this context means 'scheduled to' dock together with the idea of 'being in a state of preparation or preparedness' for docking.

    'all set to' introduces the sense that the action is imminent: He's all set to fly out at a minutes notice.

    There is also 'set to' meaning 'begin doing something vigorously' : He set to work cleaning up the mess.

    And if that wasn't enough, there's also 'have a set-to' with someone. This is a colloquial expression, referring to a brief argument or fight, usually pretty heated.
    Last edited by David L.; 26-Mar-2009 at 16:04.

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