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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    me, too

    Hi there,
    Is it correct to use 'me, too' in the following dialgues?

    1. A: I love you. B: Me, too.
    2. A: I want to be with you. B: Me, too.

    tks
    pete


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #2

    Re: me, too

    Quote Originally Posted by peter123 View Post
    Hi there,
    Is it correct to use 'me, too' in the following dialgues?

    1. A: I love you. B: Me, too.
    2. A: I want to be with you. B: Me, too.

    tks
    pete
    Informally yes.
    Last edited by svartnik; 28-Mar-2009 at 14:05.


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 248
    #3

    Re: me, too

    No, It's not OK to use "me too" in that context: It would mean "and I too love myself."
    And the second expression would mean "and I also want to be with myself."


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
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    #4

    Re: me, too

    Quote Originally Posted by gabber View Post
    No, It's not OK to use "me too" in that context: It would mean "and I too love myself."
    And the second expression would mean "and I also want to be with myself."
    That is a surprising answer coming from a native teacher.

  2. Senior Member
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    #5

    Re: me, too

    Hi there,
    Yes, I agree.
    What is the proper and natural reply of the number 2?

    tks
    pete


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #6

    Re: me, too

    Quote Originally Posted by peter123 View Post
    Hi there,
    Yes, I agree.
    What is the proper and natural reply of the number 2?

    tks
    pete
    1. I love you too.
    2. Likewise. It is the same for me.

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    #7

    Re: me, too

    1. "I want a burger." "Me too."
    2. "I would like to thank MrQ for his sterling contribution to our efforts." "So would I."
    3. "I love you." "Me too."
    4. "I love you." "I love you too."


    "Me too" in #1 is a natural expression of agreement. In a more formal context, it might sound inappropriate or flippant (see #2).

    "Me too" as a response to "I love you" (see #3) is semantically a little odd, but is sometimes used, especially where the respondent is embarrassed, or unwilling to use the more explicit confirmation of #4.

    All the best,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  3. Senior Member
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    #8

    Re: me, too

    Hi there,
    So is it correct to say like this?
    A: I want to be with you. B: Me, too.
    tks
    pete

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    #9

    Re: me, too

    I would say it's open to a charge of semantic oddity, from an examiner, and evasiveness, from an addressee. To avoid this, rephrase as "I want to be with you too".

    (But there are times when it is prudent to be odd or evasive.)

    All the best,

    MrP

    Not a professional ESL teacher.

  4. Senior Member
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    #10

    Re: me, too

    Hi there,
    Actually, I saw a film in which the two leading actor and actresses said that the following conversation after their misunderstanding was over.

    Peter: I want to be with you.
    Mary: Me, too.

    In this case, can I explain like this?
    "Me too" as a response to "I want to be with you." is semantically a little odd, but is sometimes used, especially where the respondent is embarrassed, or unwilling to use the more explicit confirmation.

    tks
    pete

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