Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    adjunct of an adverb

    What is the adjunct of an adverb?
    I only need to find out the adjunct from the sentence.

    1: I tried to lift the box, but it was too heavy.
    "I tried to" = adjunct
    "but it was too heavy." = Adjunct
    "Lift the box" = can't be on it's on can it?
    I think I am wrong in this sentence ????
    INSTEAD = I think "lift" in this sentence is more like a transitive verb with a complement and an adjunct. Because "lift the box" can be on it's on therefore "I tried to" = a complement and "but it was too heavy" = adjunct

    Just like in this example:
    He "crushed" the bug with his foot.
    "crushed" = transitive verb
    "the bug"= complement
    "with his foot" = adjunct

    2: She worked hard in the garden.
    "hard in the garden" = adjunct in this sentence, because "hard"= manner adverb, "in the garder" directional adverb.
    Adjunct meaning an extra information in the sentence.

    3: She walked very slowly.
    "very slowly" = Adjunct
    because She walked can be on it's on, and very slowly is just a additional info about this things. = walked.


    Am I right with this question?
    Sorry for asking so many questions
    Last edited by kiwishop; 31-Mar-2009 at 00:37.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #2

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    I tried to lift the box, but it was too heavy.

    the second clause is a modicative adnominal adjunct

    modicative: establish how the action happened (it did not happen)
    adnominal: modifies a noun (box)

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 1,507
    #3

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by kiwishop View Post
    What is the adjunct of an adverb?
    I only need to find out the adjunct from the sentence.

    1: I tried to lift the box, but it was too heavy.
    "I tried to" = adjunct
    "but it was too heavy." = Adjunct
    "Lift the box" = can't be on it's on can it?
    I think I am wrong in this sentence ????
    INSTEAD = I think "lift" in this sentence is more like a transitive verb with a complement and an adjunct. Because "lift the box" can be on it's on therefore "I tried to" = a complement and "but it was too heavy" = adjunct

    Just like in this example:
    He "crushed" the bug with his foot.
    "crushed" = transitive verb
    "the bug"= complement
    "with his foot" = adjunct

    2: She worked hard in the garden.
    "hard in the garden" = adjunct in this sentence, because "hard"= manner adverb, "in the garder" directional adverb.
    Adjunct meaning an extra information in the sentence.

    3: She walked very slowly.
    "very slowly" = Adjunct
    because She walked can be on it's on, and very slowly is just a additional info about this things. = walked.
    I don't mean to be rude, but you appear not even to know what you're supposed to be looking for here. It's therefore little wonder that most of what you say (particularly with regard to the first sentence) is wrong! You are - I can only presume from the majority of your answers - intended to be identifying the adverbial adjunct in each case (not the 'adjunct of/to an adverb' - a different thing altogether!)

    Taking your sentences one by one:

    1. There is no adverbial adjunct whatsoever in

    I tried to
    lift the box, but it was too heavy.

    (Are you sure that you have copied the sentence correctly??)

    The parts that you tentatively identify here as adjuncts are actually coordinate clauses (two essentially equal, independent clauses loosely linked by a coordinating conjunction) - about as different from an adjunct as it is possible to be!

    2.
    In

    He crushed the bug with his foot.

    your analysis is partially correct, in that 'with his foot' actually is an adverbial adjunct to VP 'crushed the bug', although 'bug' here is a direct object, not a mere complement!

    3. Yes, you are correct: 'slowly' serves as an adverbial adjunct to 'walked'.

    I would seriously recommend that, before attempting any further exercises of this kind, you urgently see your teacher to get some clear explanation of the meaning of the relevant grammatical terminology, otherwise, quite frankly, such homework is a complete waste of time!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by svartnik
    I tried to lift the box, but it was too heavy.

    the second clause is a modicative adnominal adjunct

    modicative: establish how the action happened (it did not happen)
    adnominal: modifies a noun (box)

    I'm afraid that this analysis is quite incorrect: as stated above, 'but it was too heavy' is a coordinate clause and as such cannot be classified as an 'adjunct' of any kind. An adjunct, as the term is used by grammarians, is a word or phrase that is syntactically subordinate to another (not an independent clause loosely conjoined to a preceding one by 'but'!) An adjunct to a noun would be a word such as a determiner or adjective (e.g. respectively 'the' or 'heavy' in the heavy box). An adjunct to an adjective or an adverb would typically be an(other) adverb (e.g. 'very' in very full or very quickly), while an adjunct to a verb could range from a simple adverb to an entire subordinate clause.





    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #4

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    Svartnik, I think Philo is right. Any sentence can be split into word combinations, and each of such word combinations would have a kernel word (главное слово) and an adjunct (зависимое слово).

    I had totally forgotten about the matter, but then, almost by chance, I found the letter in the kitchen.

    had totally forgotten
    had forgotten about the matter
    almost by chance
    found the letter
    found in the kitchen


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #5

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Svartnik, I think Philo is right.
    в самом деле

    Yes, I was wrong, sorry. Now I see the errrors of my ways.

  2. #6

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    Philo2009,
    I appreciated your help very much, but to be honest with you, I felt very sad after I read your reply "I don't mean to be rude, but you appear not even to know what you're supposed to be looking for here. It's therefore little wonder that most of what you say (particularly with regard to the first sentence) is wrong! You are - I can only presume from the majority of your answers - intended to be identifying the adverbial adjunct in each case (not the 'adjunct of/to an adverb' - a different thing altogether!) I would seriously recommend that, before attempting any further exercises of this kind, you urgently see your teacher to get some clear explanation of the meaning of the relevant grammatical terminology, otherwise, quite frankly, such homework is a complete [U]waste of time!"

    I am very hurt after I read it, I think you are just been rude! To be honest with you I've tried my best in every single questions.
    If I knew the answer then I would not come here and asking for a help, and if I know how to do such exercise then I can be one of the teacher too, can I?
    But thank you very much for your time.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #7

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    My second attempt:

    I tried to lift the box, but it was too heavy.
    He "crushed" the bug with his foot.


    2: She worked hard in the garden.


    3: She walked very slowly.

    Slowly, she walked -- is this what we call a predication adjunct?


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #8

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    My second attempt:

    I tried to lift the box, but it was too heavy.
    He "crushed" the bug with his foot.


    2: She worked hard in the garden.


    3: She walked very slowly.

    Slowly, she walked -- is this what we call a predication adjunct?
    I'm afraid 'hard in the garden' doesn't make a unit. It should be 'worked hard' and 'worked in the garden'.

    I don't know what 'predication adjunct' could mean.
    In the verb phrase 'walked slowly', the adjunct is 'slowly'.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #9

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    I'm afraid 'hard in the garden' doesn't make a unit. It should be 'worked hard' and 'worked in the garden'.

    I don't know what 'predication adjunct' could mean.
    In the verb phrase 'walked slowly', the adjunct is 'slowly'.
    We can call these units Moskva or Budapest. Does it matter what names we attach to them as long as we do not have a clue what these sentences mean?


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #10

    Re: adjunct of an adverb

    If I had to parse this sentence, I would do this:

    She worked hard in the garden

    She = S
    worked = V
    hard = adverb of mode
    in the garden = adverb of place

    It is a matter of established conventions what we call them.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] what the adverb clause modifies
    By Raen in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 23-Sep-2008, 14:31
  2. Adverb Clause of reason an Adverb clause of purpose
    By vipreeth in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 21-Feb-2008, 14:05
  3. The is an adverb
    By Grablevskij in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2008, 22:09
  4. Adjective or Adverb?
    By justinwschang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Sep-2007, 14:27
  5. Adverb clause : Please Help
    By suteja in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-May-2007, 10:35

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •