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    • Join Date: Mar 2006
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    #1

    what is the difference

    what is the difference
    1- I have been learning Eng since 2000 .
    2- I have been learning Eng for nine years.
    think

  1. engee30's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
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      • Poland
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    #2

    Smile Re: what is the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by RHOMA View Post
    what is the difference
    1- I have been learning Eng since 2000 .
    2- I have been learning Eng for nine years.
    think
    If Eng means something other than English, then your sentences are fine. #1 tells us about the moment at which you started learning Eng; #2 tells us about the period of time over which you've been learning Eng.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #3

    Re: what is the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by RHOMA View Post
    what is the difference
    1- I have been learning Eng since 2000 .
    2- I have been learning Eng for nine years.
    think
    1. means your relationship with the English language started 9.25< x <10.25 years ago.
    2. means 9.0 years ago.


  2. LeighS's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: what is the difference

    Quote Originally Posted by engee30 View Post
    If Eng means something other than English, then your sentences are fine. #1 tells us about the moment at which you started learning Eng; #2 tells us about the period of time over which you've been learning Eng.
    Engee, I wouldn't personally define the first example as 'the moment at which you started learning Eng' It might be better understood as 'the time continuing up till now'. To use 'moment' one would have to be far more specific as to what 'moment' you're referring to (exact date, time, etc)


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #5

    Re: what is the difference

    Adding to what LeighS. has posted:
    'since' as a preposition refers to the intervening period between (the time mentioned, which here is 2000) and the time under consideration, NOW, as the person speaks.
    There is no difference in terms of any 'specific moment' between whether the math has been done for us: 'it was the year 2000'; or 'it was 9 years ago - you go figure!'
    Present Perfect specifically relates to a retrospective view of a period of time, extending up to NOW. This is also true as here, with the Present Perfect Continuous, which also indicates that the speaker sees the action/event as continuing from NOW into the future, but with a definite end envisioned - even if that 'end' is death, as, in effect, 'I expect I will be a student of the language all my life'.


    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #6

    Re: what is the difference

    'since 2000' defines a period of one year within which I started learning English.

    01/01/2000 (8.25 years ago) - 31/12/2000 (9.25 years ago)

    'for 9 years' means 9 years back from now.


    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 14
    #7

    Re: what is the difference

    thanks alot for all
    Last edited by RHOMA; 31-Mar-2009 at 13:25.

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