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    #1

    Word

    If I don't go now, the train will have left.

    If I don't go now, the train would have left.

    If I don't go now, the train must have left.

    If I don't go now, the train can have left.

    If I don't go now, the train could have left.

    Are these good sentences? Please.
    Last edited by puzzle; 01-Apr-2009 at 11:28.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Word

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    If I don't go now, the train will have left.

    If I don't go now, the train would have left.(This'd be OK: "If I didn't go now [strictly, 'then' but it's a convention of story-telling that you can add a sense of urgency by using present-related adverbs with past-tense verbs], the train would have left ". )


    If I don't go now, the train must have left. (This'd be OK: "The train must have left by now". [No conditional])

    If I don't go now, the train can have left. - 'may' or 'might' would be better

    If I don't go now, the train could have left.

    Are these good sentences? Please.
    Good question!

    b

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    #3

    Re: Word

    A," Well, supper is ready. They have gone? Why didn't you ask them to stay for supper with us ?"

    B,"I was so tied of hearing them talking that I couldn't have endured through supper."

    In this case, "couldn't have endured" means a future action? Please.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Word

    The unstated conditional if "if they had stayed."
    If they had stayed for dinner, I couldn't have endured it.

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    #5

    Re: Word

    B,"I was so tied of hearing them talking that I couldn't have endured through supper."

    Can I replace "couldn't" with "won't" and "wouldn't" in this case?


    If I don't go now, the train will have left.
    I will have worked late tomorrow.

    If the second sentence is not acceptable, why the first "will have left" can mean a future action, the second "will have worked...." cannot?

    Please.
    Last edited by puzzle; 02-Apr-2009 at 06:08.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Word

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    B,"I was so tied of hearing them talking that I couldn't have endured through supper."

    Can I replace "couldn't" with "won't" and "wouldn't" in this case?

    It's an unreal condition (because, in fact, they didn't stay). So you can't use the present simple. In this case (not unreal) you could: 'If they stay, I won't...'; by the time you say that, they haven't yet left, so the condition's real.

    'Wouldn't" would sound odd in this context; 'wouldn't have lasted through supper' or 'wouldn't have been able to put up with... would be OK. (In fact, to my ear, 'endured' sounds unusual; except in poetic uses ('Man must endure') 'endure' usually has an object: 'I couldn't have endured another moment' or 'I couldn't have endured the boredom for another moment.'



    If I don't go now, the train will have left.
    I will have worked late tomorrow.

    If the second sentence is not acceptable*, why the first "will have left" can mean a future action, the second "will have worked...." cannot?
    It's more than just a future action. It's a future action seen from even further in the future (by which time it will be in the past).
    Please.
    * Who says? 'I will have worked late tomorrow, so the cleaners will be closed by the time I leave.' With that verb ('work') a continuous form would be more likely - 'I will have been working' - but with other verbs a future perfect would be perfectly acceptable: 'He will have signed the contract by then, so he won't be able to stop you.'

    b

    PS
    If you want to ask a lot of questions about conditionals, start new threads and give each one a meaningful title so that people can organize their subscriptions.

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