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    #1

    Arrow "antecedent" and "referent "

    In the name of the Merciful Allah,
    Hi,I wonder, what's the difference in grammar between "antecedent" and "referent "?



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    #2

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Quote Originally Posted by Egyption Arrow View Post
    In the name of the Merciful Allah,
    Hi,I wonder, what's the difference in grammar between "antecedent" and "referent "?
    'Antecedent' is a word represented by another word in a sentence.
    'Referent' is a real thing (piece of the real world) represented by a word in a sentence.


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    #3

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Leila went to universty but she could not finish it.

    LEila is the antecedent of she
    university is the antecedent of it

    the referent of she is Leila
    the referent of it is univ



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    #4

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    Leila went to universty but she could not finish it.

    LEila is the antecedent of she
    university is the antecedent of it

    the referent of she is Leila
    the referent of it is univ

    Hi Svartnik.
    Look at the syllogism you've produced:
    If Leila = the antecedent of she,
    And Leila = the referent of she,
    The antecedent of she = the referent of she

    Which is not true.

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    #5

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    I disagree with you Clark. Please, have a look at:Antecedent: Information from Answers.com, and
    referent definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
    And so, if the referent is a pronoun-referent, it means : (the person, place, thing, or idea to which a pronoun refers). So, it is the same as antecedent. For more info, please look at: http://www.dyned.com/pdf/Study-Guides/SGAL2E.PDF, and read pages 17,18, and 19.


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    #6

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Hi Svartnik.
    Look at the syllogism you've produced:
    If Leila = the antecedent of she,
    And Leila = the referent of she,
    The antecedent of she = the referent of she

    Which is not true.
    "Leila" is both the antecedent and the referent of "she". What is your problem with this?

    antecedent = the referent of an anaphor (=usually a pronoun that refers back).

    The antecedent of she = the referent of she

    YouTube - ????? ??? - My army - Russian Red Army Choir -- this song is growing on me. Love it.


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    #7

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    You guys mix up language and reality. The referent is a piece of reality represented by a lingual sign, while the antecedent is a purely linguistic phenomenon and has something to do with anaphoric reference, when one word is used in place of another in a sentence, very often a pronoun, to avoid repetition.

    Svartnik, frankly speaking, I'd prefer 'You're in the army now' by 'Status quo' (was that the name of the British group?). As for the music you mention, I had enough of it when I myself wore uniform.


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    #8

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    You guys mix up language and reality. The referent is a piece of reality represented by a lingual sign, while the antecedent is a purely linguistic phenomenon and has something to do with anaphoric reference, when one word is used in place of another in a sentence, very often a pronoun, to avoid repetition.
    Leila went to universty but she could not finish it.

    'it' refers back to 'univ' (anaphoric reference), thus the referent of 'it' is univ. The antecedent of 'it' is 'univ'.

    she = Leila, she refers back to Leila (anaphoric reference), thus the referent of 'she' is Leila. LEila is the antecedent of ''she'.

    antecedent:
    the referent of an anaphor; a phrase or clause that is referred to by an anaphoric pronoun

    antecedent - OneLook Dictionary Search

    According to the definition, the referent of 'it' is the antecedent of 'it'.
    According to the def, the referent of 'she' is the antecedent of 'she'.

    Generally speaking, the referent of an anaphoric pronoun is the antecedent of the very same anaphoric pronoun in question.


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    #9

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Quote Originally Posted by svartnik View Post
    Leila went to universty but she could not finish it.

    'it' refers back to 'univ' (anaphoric reference), thus the referent of 'it' is univ. The antecedent of 'it' is 'univ'.

    she = Leila, she refers back to Leila (anaphoric reference), thus the referent of 'she' is Leila. LEila is the antecedent of ''she'.

    antecedent:
    the referent of an anaphor; a phrase or clause that is referred to by an anaphoric pronoun

    antecedent - OneLook Dictionary Search

    According to the definition, the referent of 'it' is the antecedent of 'it'.
    According to the def, the referent of 'she' is the antecedent of 'she'.

    Generally speaking, the referent of an anaphoric pronoun is the antecedent of the very same anaphoric pronoun in question.
    If they mean one and the same thing what's the use of having both of them?


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    #10

    Re: "antecedent" and "referent "

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    If they mean one and the same thing what's the use of having both of them?


    Only in cases of anaphoric reference do they mean the same thing, and not otherwise.

    if the reference is anaphoric:

    antecedent = referent (of the anaphoric pronoun)

    cataphoric:

    antecedent ≠ referent (of the cataphoric pronoun)

    Although I liked him, John is not too closse to heart to me.

    him -- John
    ant. -- ref.

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