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    #1

    waive

    I know I am supposed to see you in person but, due to my medical condition, can I be __________ of this obligation, please?

    How should I fill the blank and say it as informally as possible, please?
    dispensed? waived? exempted? spared?
    thanks.

  1. Monticello's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: waive

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    I know I am supposed to see you in person but, due to my medical condition, can I be __________ of this obligation, please?

    How should I fill the blank and say it as informally as possible, please?
    dispensed? waived? exempted? spared?
    thanks.
    Hi jctgf,

    Hmmm ...,

    One is not "dispensed of an obligation." Rather, "an obligation would be dispensed with." (i.e., - taken care of)

    In the same way, one does not usually talk of "being waived of an obligation." Rather, "an obligation would be (itself) waived." (i.e., excused)

    Likewise, one does not talk of "being exempted of an obligation." Rather, one would be "exempted from an obligation." (i.e., - freed from)

    And that leaves just:
    I know I am supposed to see you in person but, due to my medical condition, can I be spared of this obligation, please?
    Yes, one talks of being spared of (doing) something. This is the only one that works here. Not because it's less formal, but due to the collocation.

    Were there any other possible choices other than dispensed, waived, exempted,.or spared?


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    #3

    Re: waive

    Freed of

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    #4

    Re: waive

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi jctgf,

    Hmmm ...,

    One is not "dispensed of an obligation." Rather, "an obligation would be dispensed with." (i.e., - taken care of)

    In the same way, one does not usually talk of "being waived of an obligation." Rather, "an obligation would be (itself) waived." (i.e., excused)

    Likewise, one does not talk of "being exempted of an obligation." Rather, one would be "exempted from an obligation." (i.e., - freed from)

    And that leaves just:
    I know I am supposed to see you in person but, due to my medical condition, can I be spared of this obligation, please?
    Yes, one talks of being spared of (doing) something. This is the only one that works here. Not because it's less formal, but due to the collocation.

    Were there any other possible choices other than dispensed, waived, exempted,.or spared?
    thanks a lot.
    how would a native speaker say it, please?
    thanks.

  2. Monticello's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: waive

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    thanks a lot.
    how would a native speaker say it, please?
    thanks.
    Hi jctgf,

    I guess I was approaching this as a purely academic fill-in-the-blank exercise. If, instead, it is for a practical purpose, then try this:
    ... due to my medical condition and its extenuating circumstances, it would work best for me if we could forego meeting in person at the present time.
    Phrased this way, you are politely making it clear that such a meeting would be an imposition for you, and that otherwise there would be nothing to prevent your meeting. Also, " ... at the present time." leaves the door open for a possible future arrangement.

    Unless there was a dire and pressing need for a meeting, then, most people would be apt to understand the request and, out of empathy, concede to it.
    Last edited by Monticello; 03-Apr-2009 at 01:58.

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