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    #1

    Grammar

    A...The boss wanted to add a late shift tomorrow, but he was short one person so he had to abandon that idea.

    B...Really? No one said anything to me about that. I could have worked late tomorrow.

    In this case, can I replace "could have worked" with "will/ would/must have worked late tomorrow"? Please.
    Last edited by puzzle; 02-Apr-2009 at 05:57.

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    #2

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    A...The boss wanted to add a late shift tomorrow, but he was short one person so he had to abandon that idea.

    B...Really? No one said anything to me about that. I could have worked late tomorrow.

    In this case, can I replace "could have worked" with "will/ would/must have worked late tomorrow"? Please.
    Only "would" can be used there instead of "could".

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    #3

    Re: Grammar

    If I don't go now, the train will have left.
    I will have worked late tomorrow.

    If the second sentence is not acceptable, why the first "will have left" can mean a future action, the second "will have worked...." cannot? Please.

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    #4

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    if i don't go now, the train will have left by the time i get there.
    the original sentence above was not good; it was incomplete.

    if i don't go now, the train will leave before i get there.



    I will have worked late tomorrow. this sentence has no meaning.

    If the second sentence is not acceptable, why the first "will have left" can mean a future action, the second "will have worked...." cannot? Please.
    2006

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    #5

    Re: Grammar

    I could have worked late tomorrow.
    I will have worked late tomorrow. this sentence has no meaning.

    The first is "could" which is right, while the second is "will" which is wrong. Why? Please.


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    #6

    Re: Grammar

    Could: possibility from an objective point of view, presumptive.
    Would: implies desire and intention; certainty
    Will: suggests stronger certainty and desire than would and absoluteness.
    Must: must+have+done sth only refers to things in the past.

    In the original conversation, the second person comments on their boss's decision to give up the idea of adding a shift which, if happen, would probably see this person "work late tomorrow". In this context of talking about something external occuring in future, "will" is the first one you should cross out. Hence you can only replace could here with would. Personally I think even would sounds too intentional and certain here. Strictly speaking, could is irreplaceable here to me.

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    #7

    Re: Grammar

    In this context of talking about something external occuring in future, "will" is the first one you should cross out.

    What's meaning of 'external occuring in future'? Please.


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    #8

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    In this context of talking about something external occuring in future, "will" is the first one you should cross out.

    What's meaning of 'external occuring in future'? Please.

    External: not out of one's own volition, not according to one's desire.

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