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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #1

    Which is correct and why ?

    Noise pollution gets more attention than does air pollution

    or

    Noise pollution gets more attention than it does air pollution

    Please tell me which sentence is right and why.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: Which is correct and why ?

    Take one of your sentences:

    Noise pollution gets more attention than it does air pollution
    What does the pronoun 'it' refer to in your sentence?

    If I wrote:
    Noise pollution gets more attention than it deserves.
    ...you can see that 'it' refers back to noise pollution.

    So - in your sentence above, you are saying:
    Noise pollution gets more attention than noise pollution does air pollution!!

    So - your other sentence is correct, in omitting the unnecesary 'it'.
    Noise pollution gets more attention than does air pollution


    I would correct/comment on two other aspects...if you are learning Brit. Eng.
    If American Eng., then the sentence would be acceptable.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Apr 2004
    • Posts: 296
    #3

    Re: Which is correct and why ?

    Hi David,

    I am learning British English.
    Could you please, comment on these two other aspects?

    Thank you


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: Which is correct and why ?

    Sometimes it can't be avoided, but where possible, don't use 'get' and 'got' when it is used as a substitute for actually...actually being articulate and having a vocabulary that exceeds grunting 'that's cool', 'it sucks', and 'awesome' (the latter, I understand, starting to become tedious even in America!...though probably to be replaced by 'excruciating' or similar bastardization.)
    This holds true for formal and semi-formal writing and speech; and is mainly used in informal conversation when you are purposely 'dumbing down' e.g.
    "I've got a damn cold" compared with, "I've caught a cold."

    The second point was the use of 'attention' in the sentence. Does the writer mean 'publicity' as in 'media attention', or that the man in the street is more likely to be aware of and call the police about a neighbour's noise- and feuds develop over somebody's loud parties in the street - than he is to complain about air quality! How can I follow someone's gist and its implications in order to respond intelligently, if I'm not really sure what he's referring to!
    Whether the writer means 'attention' or 'publicity' isn't clear; but such observations (that strike me as a Britisher) seem to be regarded as hair-splitting after they travel any distance over salt water. If all one is interested in is the general 'sense' of what a person is conveying, then my stance would seem irritatingly nitpicking.

    Thanks for asking, Carla.
    Last edited by David L.; 03-Apr-2009 at 18:59.

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