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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    to take over

    "Mr. Brown is sick. Mr. Jones will be taking over the 12 o´clock class". Does take over convey that the change is temporary or permanent?

  2. engee30's Avatar
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    #2

    Post Re: to take over

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    "Mr. Brown is sick. Mr. Jones will be taking over the 12 o´clock class". Does take over convey that the change is temporary or permanent?
    To my way of thinking, it's a temporary change.

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    #3

    Re: to take over

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    "Mr. Brown is sick. Mr. Jones will be taking over the 12 o´clock class". Does take over convey that the change is temporary or permanent?
    Yes in this instance it means temporarily, as it is only one class. If it was permanent, the sentence would have to be something like
    "Mr. Brown is sick, Mr. Jones is replacing him."
    "Mr. Brown is sick, Mr. Jones is taking over for him permanently."
    "Mr. Brown is sick, Mr. Jones is replacing him in all classes from now on."

  3. beachboy's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to take over/take on

    In the second case, if the change is permanent, and Mr. Jones is replacing Mr. Brown, can I say Mr Jones is taking on the class? What other verbs can I use? Keep? Assume?

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    #5

    Re: to take over/take on

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    In the second case, if the change is permanent, and Mr. Jones is replacing Mr. Brown, can I say Mr Jones is taking on the class? What other verbs can I use? Keep? Assume?
    "Taking on" is used more as in taking on a task, not taking over an existing task.

    "Taking someone on" is also used in slang to mean that they are challenging someone."
    "You say that you are stronger than I am, I'll take you on, on that one!"

    You could use, "will teach the class(es)instead of"
    "Mr. Jones will be your teacher/professor from now on"
    "Mr. Jones is assuming Mr. Brown's duties/classes from now on."

  4. victor_amelkin's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #6

    Re: to take over

    I believe it depends on whether Mr.Brown is seriously ill or not. If it's
    serious, then the replacement is likely to be permanent. If the opposite
    is true, the replacement is temporary.

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