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    #1

    horst d'oeuvre / appetiser / starter / entree /

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to explain to me the proper meaning of the multy-functional English word “entrée” I met in an NYT’s article?

    “We started with the appetizer sampler ($12.99). …
    …The entrees were even better….
    … Desserts were cloying, and drinks were unmemorable.”
    Here is an excerpt from my Dictionary:
    1. In America, the term "entrée" refers to the main course of a meal. 2. In parts of Europe, it refers to the dish served between the fish and meat courses during formal dinners. 3. In Australia, the entrée is the first course or appetizer.

    What a shambles!!!

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  1. victor_amelkin's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #2

    Re: horst d'oeuvre / appetiser / starter / entree /

    Collins:

    entrée
    1) a dish served before a main course
    2) chiefly the main course of a meal
    3) the power or right of entry

    • Etymology: 18th century from French, from entrer to ENTER;
    in cookery, so called because formerly the course was served
    after an intermediate course called the relevé (remove).

    [EDITED]

    It seems, "hors d'oeuvre" must be spelled without 't' at the end
    of "hors".


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    #3

    Re: horst d'oeuvre / appetiser / starter / entree /

    1. In America, the term "entrée" refers to the main course of a meal. 2. In parts of Europe, it refers to the dish served between the fish and meat courses during formal dinners. 3. In Britain and Australia, the entrée is the first course or appetizer.


    Yep! Though it's understandable, with fine dining be less in practice than your '3 course meal', that with the fish course eliminated, the meal would begin with the entrée = first course.
    entrée, back in the 1700s, denoted a piece of instrumental music forming the first part of a suite. Now...

    Since we have borrowed the word from the French, perhaps some member from France could enlighted as to its meaning there today vis-à-vis the courses at a meal.
    Last edited by David L.; 05-Apr-2009 at 11:38.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: horst d'oeuvre / appetiser / starter / entree /

    Please note it is "hors d'oeuvre" not horst. Horst is German for aerie, while hors d'oeuvre means "outside the opus" or "not the main thing", i.e. a small side dish.

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    #5

    Re: horst d'oeuvre / appetiser / starter / entree /

    It has never made sense to me either that in Canada, the entree (don't know how to make the accent!) is the main course.

    In my French course, the entree is the first course, or appetizer, and the main course is the "Plat principal"

    That makes a lot more sense to me.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: horst d'oeuvre / appetiser / starter / entree /

    You're right, North Americans have misunderstood or changed the original French meaning, but perhaps it's cultural: we generally have a salad first (it's fast) then the first course is the only main course, i.e. the entree is the plat principal.

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