Results 1 to 3 of 3

    • Join Date: Feb 2005
    • Posts: 296
    #1

    The difference between "radio" and "wireless"

    Hello.

    I'd like to ask you a question.

    What is the difference between "radio" and "wireless"?

    I went into my dictionary. The results are as follows.

    (Longman "Dictionary of English language and culture")
    -----------------------------------------------------
    radio:

    1 an apparatus for receiving sounds broadcast through the air by means of
    electrical waves

    2 the sending or receiving of sounds through the air by electrical waves

    3 the radio broadcasting industry

    4 on the radio: broadcast or broadcasting by radio

    ******************************************
    wireless: without (using) wires; connected by radio

    ------------------------------------------------------

    According to the explanation, "radio" has a meaning that it is something public ly broadcast, while "wireless" doesn't.

    What do you think about this?

    Thank you in advance, native teachers.

    Best Regards,

    peppy_man

  1. Monticello's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 455
    #2

    Re: The difference between "radio" and "wireless"

    Hi peppy_man,

    The word wireless as a synonym for radio is chiefly British usage. (When referring to the public transmission through space of electromagnetic waves in the approximate frequency range of 535 kilohertz to 1,700 kilohertz, i.e., AM broadcast radio, American usage of "the wireless" recalls the early days of radio, i.e., the 1920's and earlier.)

    Now, of course, the word wireless has a more encompassing meaning. For this modern definition, as well as a thorough historical background, please see this wiki article on wireless. Also, for purposes of comparison, please see this wiki article on radio.
    Last edited by Monticello; 05-Apr-2009 at 19:48.

  2. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: The difference between "radio" and "wireless"

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi peppy_man,

    The word wireless as a synonym for radio is chiefly British usage. (When referring to the public transmission through space of electromagnetic waves in the approximate frequency range of 535 kilohertz to 1,700 kilohertz, i.e., AM broadcast radio, American usage of "the wireless" recalls the early days of radio, i.e., the 1920's and earlier.)

    Now, of course, the word wireless has a more encompassing meaning. For this modern definition, as well as a thorough historical background, please see this wiki article on wireless. Also, for purposes of comparison, please see this wiki article on radio.
    I'd add a significant rider to that first sentence (which I expect the Wikipedia article explains). The difference is not just US/UK, but 'wireless' is fairly dated. English people heard Churchill's 'We'll fight them on the beaches...' speech on the wireless; but we heard President Obama's inauguration on the radio.

    In the '60s, there was a distinction between a "wireless radio" (usually operating on mains power) and a 'transistor radio' (sometimes shortened to 'tranny'. But today 'wireless' is only used as an intentional archaism (when it means 'radio' - the noun).

    The much more common use for 'wireless' is as an adjective with relation to WiFi networking.

    b

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •