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      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 222
    #1

    Why

    Hello!

    I finished to read "Robin Hood" and I noticed an unknown locution.

    "Is it true that Sir Guy of Coventry was your unkle?", asked Robin.
    "Why, yes, Robin", answered his mother.

    1. What the "Why" is there for? (The same is repeating through the book)
    2. Could I say - I finished reading "Robin Hood"...

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by greegorush; 07-Apr-2009 at 06:00.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 394
    #2

    Re: Why

    "Is it true that Sir Guy of Coventry was your unkle?", asked Robin.
    "Why, yes, Robin", answered his mother.

    1. What the "Why" is there for? (The same is repeating through the book)
    The word why is sometimes used as a mild interjection at the beginning of a sentence. It's basically like saying "As a matter of fact he was, Robin." There are a seemingly infinite number of equivalent expressions that serve the same purpose.
    I finished to read "Robin Hood"...

    2. Could I say - I finished reading "Robin Hood"...
    Why, you could indeed--especially if you want to be grammatically correct. I finished to read "Robin Hood" is wrong. You don't finish to do st, you finish doing st. Follow it with a gerund, not an infinitive.

    Why, I believe we're done here.

    Hope this helps.

    Greg

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Jan 2009
    • Posts: 222
    #3

    Re: Why

    Why, this is an awesome explanation :) Thanks!
    And thanks for an answer to the second question.

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