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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #1

    What does that mean ?

    Hello,

    I just found a name for a brand : S w e l t y
    It's an invented word, but it's short and easy to remember.

    I've few questions :
    What people first see in that word : swell or swelt ?

    Do you thing the word "S W E L T Y" as a brand name would be cool for the US market (I'm French).

    What it makes you think/feel ? good ? not good ? funny name ? ridiculous ? simple ? too complicated ? Positive name ? Negative ?

    What is a good connotation for that word ?

    I'm French so I do not know the sensibility of English speaking people when they see a new invented name.

    Thanks for your feedback

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What does that mean ?

    Hi vfjcxxxx

    Q1. What do people first see in that word swell or swelt?
    First, swelt isn't the past participle of swell; it's swelled, pronounced swell[d], not swel[t]. So, no, I didn't see 'swell' in Swelty.

    Second, swelty is obsolete; people don't use it anymore. I had to look the word up in the dictionary--you can imagine my surprise when I read the 1st entery: to die, and that used for brand. Hmm.

    Q2. Do you think the word "S W E L T Y" as a brand name would be cool for the US market (I'm French).
    Uhm, yes and no. Yes, because it'd be a new word, so it could carry any meaning you market it to carry. No, because I don't know what the product is.
    Q3. Does it make you feel good, not good, does it have a funny name, is it ridiculous, is it too simple, is it too complicated, is it positive, negative?
    What's the product?
    Q4. What is a good connotation for that word?
    It's a new word for me, and I can't seem to connect it morphologically to any of the words I know. That I now know what it means ('cause I looked it up), I'd have to give to faint, swoon, etc.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #3

    Re: What does that mean ?

    It does rather depend on what the product is. The nearest sounding word that came to my mind was "swelter", which may not be what you want for a new link of t-shirts.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #4

    Re: What does that mean ?

    The name is for an Internet Company and for a website. The website is a system for giving suggestions to users (a kind of search engine). That's why it need to sound cool, to be short, remenberable, and sound friendly for the American/English people.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #5

    Re: What does that mean ?

    I do not feel that it gives any indication to a possible user as to why they should go to the site, or what the site is offering.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #6

    Re: What does that mean ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    I do not feel that it gives any indication to a possible user as to why they should go to the site, or what the site is offering.

    Thanks for your answer. The fact is that it's really difficult to find a short domain name that sound cool for the English Market. Because I'm french, I do not have the perception of english speaking people. I just do not want to launch my website and people think "What's that ridiculous name ?" or "it's a really bad name for a brand".

    My real questions are :
    1) can I go to the US market with "S w e l t y . c o m" as a brand name for an Internet company
    2) How does it sound ? is that name easy too remenber ? easy to spell ? Is this name user friendly ?
    3) I must be sure that this invented name is not badly connoted, I want to be sure the name is perceived as positive, in fact not perceived as negative connotations
    4) For example : when I ask my french friends about S w e l t y . c o m, they love the name because in french, it sounds cool, and it's short, a bit like Sweety. The name is perceived as "tiny and sweet" (mignon) by french people. It's easy in France to developp such a name over the Internet. I want to be sure that's the same for the english speaking market (ie. UK and US)

    Thanks again for your time

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What does that mean ?

    1) Well, I kind of like it. A lot.

    2) It sounds BIG, blow out, bulging, HOT as in a sweltering day (oppressive heat)--ah, now I see the swell you spoke of in your first post. It also brings to mind the AmE 1950's word swell, meaning first-rate, later on used by children and teens, but it's out-dated these days. Its spelling seems simple enough: it sounds like it's spelled. I don't see people having trouble spelling it.

    3) While the word sweltering brings up images of sweat brought on by excessive heat, SWELTY doesn't, because of how it's syllabified: SWEL'TY. It's SWEL(L) we see, not sweltering. Swell's connotation is positive, not negarive. Plus it sounds like svelt (svelte definition | Dictionary.com).

    4) Well, I wonder how cool "google" sounded at first? Does it even matter? It's the quality of the service that matters in the end, right?

    I like the name.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #8

    Re: What does that mean ?

    Thank you very very much for your time. I'm realy happy that you like the name.
    It's cool.

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    #9

    Re: What does that mean ?

    I'm afraid that I don't agree. I don't like it because it is too close to "sweaty" which does not have a nice connotation to me.

    However, having said that, if the product/service/website is fabulous, it can overcome any negative connection.

    I remember very well how in the musice scene of the nineteen fifties and sixties, artists were often encouraged to change their name and take a name which was easy to remember. One artist from England said that if the music is good, no matter what the name is you will make it. To prove it he said he would take the name of "Egelbert Humperdinck" which was fairly unusual and difficult for English speaking people to remember and pronounce. He did become very popular and made many chart topping hits.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #10

    Re: What does that mean ?

    thank you very much for your feedback. Do you prefer "S w e l e n" ?
    it's a play on S w e l l and S w e v e n (a vision in a dream)

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