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    #1

    I and me

    "The kids are fine, thanks. They keep my wife and me very busy."

    Shall I use 'I' instead of 'me' in the above sentence?

    Tks / ju

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I and me

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    "The kids are fine, thanks. They keep my wife and me very busy."

    Shall I use 'I' instead of 'me' in the above sentence?

    Tks / ju
    They keep us (my wife and me) busy.

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    #3

    Re: I and me

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    They keep us (my wife and me) busy.
    Dear Soup,

    Thanks for your reply. But can I still use my wife and me & my wife and I to replace your suggested us in the above sentence? I really want to clarify.

    Tks / ju

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I and me

    Quote Originally Posted by Ju View Post
    Dear Soup,

    Thanks for your reply. But can I still use my wife and me & my wife and I to replace your suggested us in the above sentence? I really want to clarify.

    Tks / ju
    The prescribed rule is to use "me" if that pronoun functions as an object of a verb; i.e., keep me, not keep I.

    From a descriptive point of view, speakers do indeed use "I" instead of "me" in that context. It's a classic example of hypercorrection:
    A construction or pronunciation produced by mistaken analogy with standard usage out of a desire to be correct, as in the substitution of I for me in on behalf of my parents and I.

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