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    #1

    Could you reason why ...

    Could you reason why this sentence uses this tense?

    Why do you leave early? (The moment when a speaker was speaking to an interlocutor, the interlocutor was standing up from a dining table and readying to leave)


    Thank you for every post.

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Could you reason why ...

    Hi Supachoke

    Ex: Why do you leave early?

    Use the simple present tense when you want to express an action as habitual; e.g., s/he always leaves early.


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    #3

    Re: Could you reason why ...

    but in this case he leaves early for only that day.

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    #4

    Re: Could you reason why ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Supachoke View Post
    but in this case he leaves early for only that day.
    Then I would have to say that it's either archaic (old, out-of-date) or a speech error.

    Suggested correction, Why are you leaving early?


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    #5

    Re: Could you reason why ...

    Because he is not referring to the actual action of 'leaving' -'why are you leaving? - but that the person's reaction to something said/done is to get up and leave abruptly.

    So - if I was all shaken up and telling a co-worker in a supermarket about a terrible experience I had had with an irate customer, and my co-worker started to laugh, I might say:
    Me: "Why do you laugh? It was awful. All the other customers were looking at me, as if I must have been really rude to this poor old lady!
    He: - Because that's Mrs. Brown. She complains about everybody in every store she goes into!

    Can you see that I didn't say, 'why are you laughing?' - I'm not asking what the joke is
    - I say, 'why do you laugh?' because his response, his reaction to my tale of woe surprises me: he laughs when I expected him to be all serious and sympathetic and commiserate with me.
    Last edited by David L.; 11-Apr-2009 at 23:34.

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