Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. Unregistered
    Guest
    #1

    Smile victor and vanquished

    *Another great war could destroy victor and vanquished alike.

    I think 'vanquished' is used as a noun in the above sentence.
    But does 'vanquished' needs 'the' such as 'the sick' and 'the young'.
    Is it possible to use 'vanquished' without 'the'? If so, could you give me another examples and explanation?

    Thanks for reading.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 670
    #2

    Re: victor and vanquished

    There is nothing wrong with the sentence:

    Another great war could destroy victor and vanquished alike. Equally you could write:

    Another great war could destroy the victor and the vanquished alike.
    I prefer the first.

    Do you know the saying: Who goes there, friend or foe? We never say: Who goes there, a friend or a foe?

    Recently, in another context, Soup said language goes from the complex to the simplex. That is to say anything that can be left out without compromising the meaning content will or can be.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 670
    #3

    Re: victor and vanquished

    There you go: I left out 'left out' at the end!!!!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •