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    #1

    Make a Move

    Hi Teachers

    I understand the phrase carries several meanings.

    Is it common among native speakers of English to say 'make a move' to a host when a guest wishes to leave the former's house?

    Ex - It's getting get, I have to make a move.

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Make a Move

    It's a chess analogy I think; it means stop hesitating and do something. It can mean depart, make an offer, or any other significant decision that involves a response from someone else.

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    #3

    Re: Make a Move

    Thanks, konungursvia. But is the phrase common among native speakers though? I am asking this because it seems to be common in Malaysia.


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    #4

    Re: Make a Move

    Yes, very commonly used as a polite way of introducing the idea that you must go home now.

    Note the ways it can be expressed:

    It's getting late. I'd better start thinking about making a move.

    It's getting late. I'll have to start making a move.

    Look at the time! I need to make a move.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Make a Move

    In AE it's not so common as "get moving" for that departure situation. Here it generally means "initiate a new social interaction" as in hesitating to introduce yourself to someone, then making your move. But it is common enough, and can be used the way David specifies here as well.

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    #6

    Re: Make a Move

    Thanks David and konungursvia.

    Yes, 'get going'/'get moving' sound more familiar. I believe the phrase (make a move) is also not so common in Austrialia/NZ English.


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    #7

    Re: Make a Move

    I'm trying to remember - I think it was more something like, "I'd better push off', in Australia...or am I getting that mixed up with telling someone 'to push off' = get lost!

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Make a Move

    We'd usually say I've got to "split, take off, get going" or "call it a night" rather than the other offerings, at least here , the northern area of our continent. Texas may be different.

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