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    #1

    Usage of "to" and "through"

    Hello friends,

    According to me in English there is nothing more confusing and complicating than the usage of preposition "to". It's hellishly confusing. Take for e.g.,I'll take you through the reasons for disliking atheism or I'll take you to the reasons for disliking atheism. Can somebody tell me which one is correct ?

    This is just one example, I can cite myriad.. we were told that "to" is used for subject related with direction. For e.g., he's going to school etc. But this "to" seems to be more powerful than that many at time I see it's used in place of "for" also. My question is why such discrepancies? Can somebody tell me usage of "To" lucidly.

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    #2

    Re: Usage of "to" and "through"

    Quote Originally Posted by razer View Post
    hello friends,

    according to me in english there is nothing more confusing and complicated than the usage of preposition "to". It's hellishly confusing. yes, it can be very complicated and confusing.


    take for e.g.,i'll take you through the reasons for disliking atheism or i'll take you to the reasons for disliking atheism. Can somebody tell me which one is correct ?
    "through" is correct. "take you through the reasons" means something like tell you what the reasons are/explain the reasons to you.



    this is just one example, i can cite myriad.. We were told that "to" is used for subject related with direction. For e.g., he's going to school etc. But this "to" seems to be more powerful than that many at time i see it's used in place of "for" also. My question is why such discrepancies? Can somebody tell me usage of "to" lucidly. this is too big a topic for me to answer now. You can only learn this gradually.
    i will say that "to" and "for" have different meanings. Sometimes either one can be used in the same place of a sentence, but with different meanings.

    see this post, for example. (although it's a bit complicated)
    https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...olunteers.html

    2006

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