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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #1

    Question Please help!

    Hi im Chris and im currently doing a TEFL course online, I'm having some trouble with a grammar question, i'll include my answers, could somone tell me if they are correct?

    a) I - Personal pronoun
    b) usually - Adverb
    c) go - Verb
    d) swimming - Gerund
    e) with - Conjunction
    f) my - Personal Pronoun
    g) best - Adjective
    h) friend - Noun
    i) and - Conjunction
    j) his - Pronoun
    k) rather - Adverb
    l) unusual - Verb
    m) girlfriend - Noun

    Thanks. Chris.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Please help!

    Hi Chris,

    Quote Originally Posted by junior View Post
    Hi im Chris and im currently doing a TEFL course online, I'm having some trouble with a grammar question, i'll include my answers, could somone tell me if they are correct?

    a) I - Personal pronoun
    b) usually - Adverb
    c) go - Verb
    d) swimming - Gerund - Participle
    e) with - Preposition
    f) my - Personal Pronoun
    g) best - Adjective
    h) friend - Noun
    i) and - Conjunction
    j) his - Pronoun
    k) rather - Adverb
    l) unusual - Adjective
    m) girlfriend - Noun

    Thanks. Chris.


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #3

    Thank you Barb D

    Thanks for the help, i spent all last night trying to get this right, but i still hadn't noticed the preposition.

    Thanks again. Chris.


  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Please help!

    I wish I understood why they make people do this. Does it really help with English?

    It's more useful for me to consider phrases. Noun phrase: my best friend. Noun phrase: his rather unusual girlfriend. Taken together, these two noun phrases are the compound noun phrase answering "who(m) do I usually go swimming with?"

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Please help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I wish I understood why they make people do this. Does it really help with English?
    Yes, it helps. Grammar is a code. The point is to be able to know/show how grammatical categories work inside the structural scaffolding of a given language. You can't do that unless you know what the categories are, right?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Please help!

    Hi Soup,

    On some level I do know this and do agree. Knowing the roles nouns play in sentences, etc. is important, but I take a top-down view. Who/what is "doing something," what is it that is being done... complete subject, complete predicate.

    The word-by-word parsing doesn't help with good writing with people at a more advanced level. (Yes, everyone has to get there somehow, though. I know.)

    I see English learners agonizing over "Is this -ing form a particple or a gerund?" when they can simply write the sentence correctly. That's when I think it's reached the point of "I can turn the key in my car, so do I really need to know how an internal combustion engine works?"

    If you can write a good, coherent sentence that communicates your meaning, and it's free of gross grammar flaws (as free as most natives are in their day-to-day communications), does it really matter what things are called?

    I guess in real life, when someone asks me the correct way to phrase something, and I start by saying "well, look, you've got this compound noun subject with is being modified by a..." and they look at me like I've grown another head, I realize that being able to name the parts isn't really that useful. Instead you say "you've got this thing and that thing working together, so that's plural, so use 'foretell' instead of 'foretells.'"

    Oh well, that's what you get when you have a writer who is more concerned about communicating meaning instead of a teacher. (And be assured, I mean NO disrespect toward teachers! Just differenet views! The coach knows how to make the arm work the most efficiently while the doctor knows how the tendons and muscles work together to make the arm move.)

  5. Soup's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Please help!

    Hi Barb

    Me, too. I also see English learners agonizing over "Is this -ing form a participle or a gerund?", but ... they can't always simply write the sentence correctly. Those who agonize over the structure do so because they were taught to do so; that's the only way they know how; to them, that's language. Yes, it's a shame, and, yes, it hinders communication, but it's the very reason Asia is housed with umpteen thousand "oral" English teachers. The students are taught to memorize lists of templatic grammatical arrays in which they are told to fill in this or that grammatical category--the whole process is much like a Las Vegas slot machine. Yes, they agonize over grammar.


    It's true, you needn't know how an internal combustion engine works in order to drive a car, but that's mechanics, not language. Speakers know intuitively how their internal system works. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to use the system.

    Students here in Asia can indeed write a good, coherent sentence that communicates meaning, yet they aren't able to communicate that in spoken language. Again, it all comes down to how they were taught to "see" English.


    Writers are a different breed. They write, and well. Teachers may not be great writers but they know how to teach. This forum has the best of both.

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    #8

    Re: Please help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Writers are a different breed. They write, and well. Teachers may not be great writers but they know how to teach. This forum has the best of both.
    Amen, sister!

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