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  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    "100's" / "100s"

    Hello Everyone,

    In England, as far as I am aware, it might have been or possibly even still is common usage to write "100's" as opposed to "100s", though doubtless people do write the latter, which I presume might be possibly standard in the US etc..

    My question is, whether "100's" is a dialectical variation and "acceptable" English or outright ungrammatical even though as is my understanding, it might have been, at least till recently or even still is, "accepted" within "regular" British English?

    Thank you very much for any help that you can provide with this matter.

    Best wishes,

    Philip.


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    #2

    Re: "100's" / "100s"

    Because of the common confusion about how to indicate possession correctly -

    e.g. childrens' or children's; John and Mary's house or John's and Mary's house;
    Adam's and Paul's cars or Adam and Paul's cars -

    ...100's might be quite common, but not "acceptable". It's 100s.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "100's" / "100s"

    The apostrophe-S combination is not advised for plurals at all, though we frequently see it with acronyms and this will probably become acceptable at some point.

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    English Teacher
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    #4

    Re: "100's" / "100s"

    Quote Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post

    My question is, whether "100's" is a dialectical variation and "acceptable" English or outright ungrammatical even though as is my understanding, it might have been, at least till recently or even still is, "accepted" within "regular" British English?

    Philip
    Philip, if it were 30 years ago, it'd be acceptable.

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