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  1. O. Turner
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    #1

    Question Appositive phrase

    In the following sentence:
    There is now now condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.
    Would the phrase "who are in Christ Jesus" be an appositive phrase?


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    #2

    Re: Appositive phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by O. Turner View Post
    In the following sentence:
    There is now now condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.
    Would the phrase "who are in Christ Jesus" be an appositive phrase?
    No, it not a case of apposition.

    those and "who are in Christ Jesus" have different syntactic function.


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    #3

    Unhappy Re: Appositive phrase

    Thanks for your response.

    What then would the phrase "who are in Christ Jesus" be?

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    #4

    Re: Appositive phrase

    An appositive is a noun or pronoun — often with modifiers — set beside another noun or pronoun to explain or identify it.
    Those is a demonstative pronoun. Who is a relative pronoun. It's right next to those. It gives information about 'those'. Seems to fit the definition of an appositive nicely, wouldn't you agree Svartnik?


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    #5

    Unhappy Re: Appositive phrase

    Thanks for your answer Pedroski.
    I originally thought that the phrase was an appositive phrase; however, Svartnik opined that it was not.

    What is the consensus?

    If it is not an appositive phrase, what is it?

    Your input is greatly appreciated.


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    #6

    Re: Appositive phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by O. Green View Post
    Thanks for your answer Pedroski.
    I originally thought that the phrase was an appositive phrase; however, Svartnik opined that it was not.

    What is the consensus?

    If it is not an appositive phrase, what is it?

    Your input is greatly appreciated.

    There is now condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.

    for those who are... -- prep phrase which functions as an adjective: it modifies "condemnation," a noun.

    those who are ... Jesus -- object of the prep. (unit)

    who are ... Jesus -- realtive clause modifying "those"

    "those" and "who are..." are not consecutive elements that have the same relation to other elements.

    This would be an example of apposition:
    There is now condemnation for those, christian people who are in Jesus Christ.

    "those" and chrsitian people who are in Jesus Christ" are two juxtaposed noun phrases.

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    #7

    Re: Appositive phrase

    Svartnik is correct: there is no apposition in this sentence.

    Apposition entails parallel syntactic function: the two phrases in question, however, are not syntactically parallel, the relative clause 'who...Jesus' standing as modifier, and therefore adjunct, to the nominal head 'those'. An adjunct to something cannot, by definition, be simultaneously in apposition to it!


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    #8

    Re: Appositive phrase



    Those adjuncts! I use too often but as yet have failed to grasp the meaning.
    Philo, please throw your definition in the hat.

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    #9

    Re: Appositive phrase

    I think the original spelling mistake messed you up.
    Ask O Green, but I would say the sentence should be:

    There is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.

    It makes no sense to say:
    There is now condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.
    The sense of the utterance is that people who have found Jesus are saved from condemnation. They won't be going to hell. Agreed on that? Then read on!

    those who are in Christ Jesus
    Those (people) who (the people who) are in Christ Jesus.

    Those is a pronoun, who refers directly back to those, nowhere else. 'who' carries the modifier 'are in Christ Jesus'. An apposite! I rest my case!

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    #10

    Re: Appositive phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    IThose is a pronoun, who refers directly back to those, nowhere else. 'who' carries the modifier 'are in Christ Jesus'. An apposite! I rest my case!
    ...on twaddle, it would seem.

    For reasons already explained, there is nothing here that, according to the standard usage of the term, would qualify as 'apposition'.

    If you choose, as you apparently have, to unilaterally redefine established grammatical terms to suit your whim or convenience, academic ethics would require, at the very least, a warning to this effect for the benefit of questioners!

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