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    #1

    is this sentence correct?

    Please advise the transporter to double check and advise if the carton box have any damage. We shall request the factory for the replacement to avoid any complain from the customer

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    #2

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Please tell:
    What does transporter mean here?
    Will the transporter 'advise' or 'inform'?I think in this context, 'inform' is better.

    My suggestion about the last sentence is:
    We will request the factory for replacement to avoid customer complaints.

  1. Monticello's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe2008 View Post
    Please advise the transporter to double check and advise if the carton box have any damage. We shall request the factory for the replacement to avoid any complain from the customer
    Hi Zoe2008,

    Try this:
    Please advise the transporter shipper to double check and advise if the carton boxes have (or singular: carton box has) any damage. If necessary, to avoid any complain from the customer customer complaints, we shall request the factory for the replacement.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    To double check is incorrect, without the hyphen: double-check. Also, you don't really say "request the factory", unless you say "request the factory send a replacement", otherwise it's best you "request a replacement from the factory."

  3. Monticello's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Hi Zoe2008,

    The English phrase double check, meaning "A careful reinspection or reexamination to assure accuracy or proper condition; verification," may be written with or without the hyphen.

    Since this phrase also carries with it a meaning particular to chess (please note: no hyphen is ever used for the chess meaning; please see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double_check), the hyphen in the first case (i.e., when meaning a verification, or the process of verifying) does serve the purpose of differentiating the two meanings. Nonetheless, context also bears meaning, and in your context it's safe to say that few, if any, would mistake your meaning for a chess king's jeopardy.

    In regard to the phrase "... request the factory for replacement.", only the most pedantic would ever imagine any "rule" that would require the "correction": "request the factory send a replacement." or "request a replacement from the factory."

    Once again, context bears meaning, and within the context of your sentence it's more than a safe bet that few, if any, would not understand the intended ellipsis. After all, in your first sentence, a reference has been made to a shipper. And what else might a shipper be apt to do but send? And from where else might the shipper be sending (replacement) but from the factory?
    Last edited by Monticello; 20-Apr-2009 at 19:51.

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    We don't write "request the factory for a replacement," in my view.

  5. Monticello's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    We don't write "request the factory for a replacement," in my view.
    Hi konungursvia,

    The following Google search: factory replacement (about 168,000 links returned as of today, 4/20/2009) clearly demonstrates prevalance of the common collocation, factory replacement.

    What exactly, then, would prevent one from writing (and another from clearly understanding) the phrase: "we shall request the factory for the replacement." within the context above?

  6. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Hi Monticello. I've always believed in the phrase "factory replacement". It's a replacement that comes from the factory. There was never any doubt about that. At no time did I ever cast doubt upon it. Nor has anyone in this thread, as far as I can see.

    But I feel sure you "request something from someone," and this act is not referred to as "requesting" the person, but requesting the something or other from the person. So, "request the factory for" any object at all seems a perversion of the use of the verb request. Each verb has its status as transitive or intransitive, and when transitive, each verb either takes or does not take any given kind of object. It's not up to us to reinvent at will.

    You can request something of someone, request somebody do something , request something from someone, but the act of contacting the factory for a replacement cannot be described as "requesting the factory..." for a replacement. I"m sure other native speakers would agree.

    Indeed, each and every one of the online dictionaries the "google: define" command calls up seems to agree as well (I cannot easily show you my OED): define: request - Google Search

  7. Monticello's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Hi Monticello. I've always believed in the phrase "factory replacement". It's a replacement that comes from the factory. There was never any doubt about that. At no time did I ever cast doubt upon it. Nor has anyone in this thread, as far as I can see.

    But I feel sure you "request something from someone," and this act is not referred to as "requesting" the person, but requesting the something or other from the person. So, "request the factory for" any object at all seems a perversion of the use of the verb request. Each verb has its status as transitive or intransitive, and when transitive, each verb either takes or does not take any given kind of object. It's not up to us to reinvent at will.

    You can request something of someone, request somebody do something , request something from someone, but the act of contacting the factory for a replacement cannot be described as "requesting the factory..." for a replacement. I"m sure other native speakers would agree.

    Indeed, each and every one of the online dictionaries the "google: define" command calls up seems to agree as well (I cannot easily show you my OED): define: request - Google Search
    Hi konungursvia,

    The OED is not available online without subscription. And even if it were, one might request others provide alternate sources.

    The point here is that American and UK usage does vary. And being American, I do not use the OED as a primary source for usage (and proud to declare so on this Massachusetts holiday, Patriots' Day).

    In other words, citing the OED here simply serves to show a difference between American & UK usage. Neither can be said to be "right" or "wrong" per se, since "rightness" or "wrongness" has everything to do with how a particular region may have adapted its English usage over the course of time.

    And as stated in post #5 above, the sentence --
    ... we shall request the factory for replacement.
    -- is an ellipsis meaning:

    ...we shall request (that) the factory (provide) for replacement (of the damaged goods).
    Last edited by Monticello; 21-Apr-2009 at 07:36.

  8. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: is this sentence correct?

    Hi Monticello,

    Once again we are engaged in a long exchange of soliloquies. I appreciate your caring, but I think we may be in danger of losing sight of our over-riding purpose here: the love of teaching. And as our Original Poster is a Young Learner From Elsewhere, rather than a native speaker of Shakespeare's language, I feel sure it behooves us to keep it as simple as possible, and to steer our young friends along the road most travelled.

    Surely learning to use the verb "request" in the following manner would be best for our learners:

    "We shall request a replacement from the factory."

    When one has a good deal of experience teaching Asian students, one becomes aware of precisely which areas they find most befuddling, and in such instances they appreciate clear and safe advice.

    Bending over backwards to justify and promote strange utterances is a bad idea in light of this. Unless we want the Asian varieties of our language of tomorrow to contain such behemoths as:

    "Honey, don't forget to invitation the guests for their attendance."

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