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    #1

    Clause or not?

    In the sentence:

    Being the chairman is a huge responsibility.

    Is 'Being the chairman' a clause? It has a subject, but is being here a verb?

    These -ing forms are kind of runts of the verb world, not much use as verbs on their own. On their own they are nouns or adjectives.
    'Is being' is the Present Continuous.


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    #2

    Re: Clause or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    In the sentence:

    Being the chairman is a huge responsibility.

    Is 'Being the chairman' a clause? It has a subject, but is being here a verb?

    These -ing forms are kind of runts of the verb world, not much use as verbs on their own. On their own they are nouns or adjectives.
    'Is being' is the Present Continuous.
    The gerund phrase acts as the subject of the sentence.
    "the chairman" is the complement of the gerund (being).

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    #3

    Re: Clause or not?

    So is 'Being the chairman' a clause? Does the original sentence have one or two clauses? That's what I'd like to know. Thanks!

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    #4

    Re: Clause or not?

    "Being a chairman" is subject of the sentece, the predicate is is and the object is a huge responsibility.It is not a clause.

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    #5

    Re: Clause or not?

    Hi Pedroski

    Additionally, Being can be part of a verb; e.g., he is being serious, he was being funny, etc., but it cannot be a verb.

    In our example sentence below, Being sits alone, which makes it verbal, not a verb:

    Ex: Being the chairman is a huge responsibility. <noun>
    Paraphrased: This job is a huge responsibility. <noun>


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    #6

    Re: Clause or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    So is 'Being the chairman' a clause?
    I have already answered this question in bold. It is a phrase (which means it is not a clause).

    It is a nominal phrase that functions as if it were one word with an identifiable part of speech.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    On their own they are nouns or adjectives
    No. It is always the context that determines their functions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    'Is being' is the Present Continuous.
    No. It is a present participle in form but gerund regarding function.
    Present continous is a tense that is realised by an auxiliary "to be" form plus the present participle form of the verb.

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    #7

    Re: Clause or not?

    Would you then please comment on this, I found on a grammar web site.
    Soup had already explained to me in a question about Leaving home that leaving was a verbal noun and can take an object as it is 'verbal'.
    But this is from a university in England.
    I should not care to contradict them, although I don't see that it is a clause.


    CLAUSES
    functioning as
    SUBJECTS


    EXAMPLE

    Finite



    That-clause [1] That his theory was flawed soon became obvious


    Nominal Relative clause[2] What I need is a long holiday

    Nonfinite




    To-infinitive clause[3] To become an opera singer takes years of training

    -ing clause[4] Being the chairman is a huge responsibility

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    #8

    Re: Clause or not?

    What you've been able to find on the Web is all correct.

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    #9

    Smile Re: Clause or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    CLAUSES
    functioning as
    SUBJECTS


    EXAMPLE

    Finite

    That-clause [1] That his theory was flawed soon became obvious
    It soon became obvious that his theory was flawed.

    Nominal Relative clause[2] What I need is a long holiday
    A long holiday is what I need.
    or
    It is a long holiday that I need.

    Nonfinite

    To-infinitive clause[3] To become an opera singer takes years of training
    It takes years to become an opera singer.

    -ing clause[4] Being the chairman is a huge responsibility
    It is a huge responsibility being a chairman.


    With the dummy-it as subject, the whole sentences look better and more comprehensible.

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    #10

    Re: Clause or not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedroski View Post
    ... from a university in England.

    -ing clause[4] Being the chairman is a huge responsibility
    Modern linguists accept the idea of a non-finite clause, a clause that is organized around a non-finite verb (Source, Wikipedia).

    Terminology

    Finite clause
    : the verb is conjugated (past, present, future)

    Non-finite clause: -ing clauses and infinitive clauses

    Ex: Being the chairman is ... .


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