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    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #1

    quote in quote

    “[…] the pits moving, accompanying their words by and up and down movement of the hand[…]. After understanding that, I accepted the true meaning of the words: ‘ The pit took three days to die…’”


    Is the paragraph above correct? If not, how can I fix it?


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #2

    Re: quote in quote

    anyone?


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 394
    #3

    Re: quote in quote

    I have a feeling nobody has figured out what in blue blazes the paragraph is talking about. I know I sure haven't. We can't correct what we can't comprehend, and this is more or less incomprehensible as it stands. The topic says quote in quote. Is there something about there being a quote within a quote that is confusing to you? Help us help you.

    Greg

    • Member Info
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      • UK
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #4

    Re: quote in quote

    I have only just seen it, but I can't get the meaning. What has been omitted?


    • Join Date: Jul 2007
    • Posts: 722
    #5

    Re: quote in quote

    Okay, that is the excerpt from one of my essays. In the story, the character said: " The pit took three days to die…", alright?
    And because I quoted a part of the story, I also quoted what the speaker said.And that speaker (main character) has a quotation mark for what he says in the story. My question is: Is it acceptable to repeat two quotation marks in the setence?


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 394
    #6

    Re: quote in quote

    OK, now we're getting somewhere. Yes, you can have quotes within quotes, and here's how to do it. The rule for nested quotation marks most often followed in American English is to start with double quotation marks for the outermost quote, and single quotation marks for a quote contained within that. If there is yet another quotation within that quote, switch back to double quotation marks, etc. For example:

    Mrs. Jackson said, "My grandmother once said to me 'You know, in my day young folks used to respect their elders. You never heard anyone say "Come on grandpa, shake a leg" or such things. I never heard such disrespect in all my life.'"

    I have attempted to use different colors to clarify the nested quotes. So, it alternates as follows:

    double < single < double... > single > double

    According to the Chicago Manual of Style, British usage is often reversed, with single quotes for the outermost quote and alternating through the nested quotes like so:

    single < double < single... > double > single

    So, in a British publication the above example might appear thusly:

    Mrs. Jackson said, 'My grandmother once said to me "You know, in my day young folks used to respect their elders. You never heard anyone say 'Come on grandpa, shake a leg' or such things. I never heard such disrespect in all my life."'

    Hope this helps.

    Greg
    Last edited by dragn; 20-Apr-2009 at 16:31.

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