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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
      • Home Country:
      • Thailand
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 287
    #1

    insidious time

    Hello,

    "Thus I won the war with insidious time, which otherwise might have softened the edge of our vengefulness or perhaps eroded it altogether."

    From the above context, is it right to say that the writer tried to subtly do something till she won the war? like repeating to her team what the enemy did to them so the hatred remains in their mind?

    What should be a better word to replace "insidious"?

    Thank you...


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: insidious time

    YES.

    Don't change it. This is an example of a literary device, the 'transferred epithet'. It was actually her words that were 'insidious', working over time to maintain the hate. But the writer imbues the very passage of time with doing this, and it becomes a powerful image. It as if time itself has been influenced, charged by her words into an instrument to stir hate.

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