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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 262
    #1

    get in vs get on

    1) He got in the car at Baker's Street.
    2) He got in to the car at Baker's Street.
    3) He got on the car at Baker's Street.

    4) He got on the bus/train/aeroplane at Baker's Street.
    5) He got on to from the bus/train/aeroplane at Baker's Street.
    6) He got in the bus/train/aeroplane at Baker's Street.

    Can someone please tell me which of the above sentences are correct?

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
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      • Native Language:
      • English
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      • Canada
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    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: get in vs get on

    Hi daemon99

    1) He got in the car at Baker's Street.
    2) He got into the car at Baker's Street.
    3) He got on the car at Baker's Street. It means he got on top of the car or on top of the hood or trunk.

    4) He got on the bus/train/airplane at Baker's Street.
    5) He got on to from the bus/train/airplane at Baker's Street. I don't know what it means.
    6) He got in the bus/train/airplane at Baker's Street. Can you take a plane at Baker's Street?

  2. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Re: get in vs get on

    The third one was funny haha. He got on top of the car haha :D

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #4

    Re: get in vs get on

    Donald, it's not funny at all.

    Where is the logic in getting in a car, but on a bus or a tram or a train or a bike?

    You are a native speaker (according to your information) so you have an instinctive knowledge of English. These prepositions have to be painstakingly memorized by English learners.

    Telling them their mistakes are funny is NOT funny, nor is it helpful. It's a shame you wasted your first post in making fun of someone else.

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