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    #1

    Isn't it a Comma Splice?

    Dear Friends,

    The following is an excerpt from an article ran by The New York Times:

    "Unemployment is rising sharply in the United States, the Chinese economy is sputtering and its exports are falling, Europe is stagnant and Japan is contracting."

    Published: April 22, 2009

    You may notice that between the clause "Unemployment is rising sharply in the United States" and "Chinese economy is sputtering" no conjunction is inserted; as much can be said about the clause "Europe is stagnant and Japan is contracting.", no conjunction.

    Is this way construction is correct?

    The sentence could be rephrased as in the following:

    "Unemployment rising sharply in the United States, the Chinese economy sputtering and its exports falling, Europe stagnant and Japan contracting."

    or

    "Unemployment is rising sharply in the United States, and the Chinese economy are sputtering and its exports falling; Europe is stagnant and Japan is contracting."

    Does my understanding stand valid?

    Regards,
    Sabya

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Isn't it a Comma Splice?

    No. A comma splice joins two unrelated sentences: 'Yesterday I went to Brighton, I like it there'. This is wrong.

    The New York Times excerpt you quoted doesn't do this. It lists global economic problems. Some writers might prefer to use semi-colons, and some most definitely wouldn't. But there is no comma splice.

    Incidentally, your first proposed rewrite isn't a sentence at all; it has no finite verb.

    b


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 394
    #3

    Re: Isn't it a Comma Splice?

    I say it stands correct as is. Here's the entire paragraph as it appears in the article:

    Serious questions loom over the global economy that would suggest lower, not higher, prices. Unemployment is rising sharply in the United States, the Chinese economy is sputtering and its exports are falling, Europe is stagnant and Japan is contracting. The World Bank forecasts that the global economy will shrink by 1.3 percent this year, the first decline in global output since World War II.

    Now, I know essentially nothing—no, check that: absolutely nothing—about economics, and so I'm not even going to pretend to be able to digest or fully grasp the import of what is being discussed. However, from a grammatical point of view, I see from the lead sentence that there are some serious questions looming about something. Gosh, whatever could they be? The sentence that follows—the sentence you're asking about—lists three of those serious questions in support of the lead sentence. I say it stands in the flow and context of the paragraph in which it appears.

    Greg
    Last edited by dragn; 23-Apr-2009 at 11:06.

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