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    #1

    70's Slang

    Where did the following 70's slangs come from?

    1. Psyche
    2. Bogue
    3. Don't be such a spaz
    4. Dream on
    5. Far out
    6. In your face
    7. Lay a gasser
    8. the Crib

  1. poorboy_9's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 70's Slang

    scbdwb, I was going to answer several of these then realised I don't want to vist my "teens" again! I think #2 should be BOGUS; and #3 refers to spastic....jus' hangin' wit my baby at da' CRIB!
    B.
    Sorry this is just too mush of a blast from the past!

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: 70's Slang

    No. 1 is a bit odd. Some psychologist borrowed it from the Greek Ψυκη - something mythological, not sure what , normally translated as 'soul' I think -and lots of "psych-" words were coined - psychiatrist (ίατρος - physician [also apparent in "iatrogenic", but that's another tangent]), psychedelic (δηλειν - to reveal), etc.

    I've never seen it spelt with the e (or perhaps I've never seen it spelt period, and always assumed it wouldn't have the e) but in the second half of the 20th century (I'd have guessed it was in the '60s) two phrasal verbs were coined:

    psych up - to get yourself psychologically ready for a big effort
    psych out - to intimidate and get a psychological advantage (think of professional boxers at the weigh-in)

    I'd also date 'far out' to the '60s. Woodstock ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Woodstock_Festival) was far out.

    b

    PS I've said this before: "slang" is not countable; we are talking here about "slang expressions"/"bits of slang" - something like that.
    Last edited by BobK; 24-Apr-2009 at 16:47. Reason: PS Added

  3. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 70's Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by poorboy_9 View Post
    scbdwb, I was going to answer several of these then realised I don't want to vist my "teens" again! I think #2 should be BOGUS; and #3 refers to spastic....jus' hangin' wit my baby at da' CRIB!
    B.
    Sorry this is just too mush of a blast from the past!
    No, we used to say "bogue" back in the 70s. It meant something unrealistic or offensive. "That's so bogue, dude."

  4. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 70's Slang

    Quote Originally Posted by scbdwb View Post
    Where did the following 70's slangs come from?
    As to where these phrases originated, I would suggest that you look up the etymology of each phrase online (Google is your friend). But if you're looking for the meanings of each...

    1. Psyche
    Used as an interjection after you've fooled someone. For example, you offer your hand in friendship, then pull it away as they reach to shake it. You'll say "Psyche!" as you pull your hand away.

    2. Bogue
    An adjective to describe something uncool or very out-of-the-norm. "You're going to tell the principal that everyone smokes cigarettes in the bathroom? That's so bogue, man."

    3. Don't be such a spaz
    "Spaz" is an abbreviation for "spastic," but when used as a slang term it doesn't mean the literal translation (that is, a person suffering from some disorder such as cerebral palsy that causes their muscles to be spastic). As a slang verb, it means to freak out, or react with unnecessary alarm. "Don't spaz out, we can clean the house up before your parents come home and they'll never know we had a party here." As a noun, it referred to someone who overreacts to a situation. "Calm down, don't be such a spaz. We're not the first students who strung toilet paper around the science lab."

    4. Dream on
    A phrase you might say to someone who has lofty ideals..."I'm going to get a brand new car for my 16th birthday." "Yeah, right. Dream on."

    5. Far out
    Same as "cool" or "amazing."

    6. In your face
    Used when you've upstaged or humiliated a person. "Hah! I *did* get a date with Melissa, the Homecoming Queen! In your face, dude!"

    7. Lay a gasser
    Refers to flatulence, but not a very common phrase.

    8. the Crib
    The place where you live.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: 70's Slang

    I didn't know that meaning of "psyche", and in Br Eng "in your face" isn't used in a defiant way, but is used of the same sort of person or comment - 'a very in-your-face sort of person'.

    b

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