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    #1

    underrepresented...

    May I know the meanings of the following words/phrases in red?


    1. If only locally educated people are included in the jury pool, those with foreign background will be underrepresented.

    2. He added that the practice of share splitting 'flies in the face' of the spirit of legistlative provisions to protect minority shareholders.

    3. Freddie and Fannie Mae, the mortgage-finance companies seized last year by the US government, reported that they had received federal grand jury subpoenas and were the subject of an SEC inquiry.

    4. Hammered by the US recession, the two publicly owned firms were bailed out at a cost to taxpayers of up to US$200 billion.

    5. His crimes were extremely anti-social in nature, committed for his sexual appeptite or for the sake of soothing personal anxiety.

    6. The Audit Commission did not spare the rod when it looked over the nutrition and exercise programs of primary school and found things amiss.


    Tks / ju


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 394
    #2

    Re: underrepresented...

    1. If only locally educated people are included in the jury pool, those with foreign background will be underrepresented.
    Since it is likely that those with foreign backgrounds have been educated elsewhere, including only those who have been locally educated would exclude the majority of those with foreign backgrounds. Thus, there will be a smaller percentage of people with foreign backgrounds included in the jury pool than may actually exist in the population.
    2. He added that the practice of share splitting 'flies in the face' of the spirit of legistlative provisions to protect minority shareholders.
    If a practice or belief flies in the face of something, it seems to operate in opposition or contradiction to it.
    3. Freddie and Fannie Mae, the mortgage-finance companies seized last year by the US government, reported that they had received federal grand jury subpoenas and were the subject of an SEC inquiry.
    The SEC is the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is an independent government agency that oversees the stock exchanges in the United States and other things related to the trading of securities.
    4. Hammered by the US recession, the two publicly owned firms were bailed out at a cost to taxpayers of up to US$200 billion.
    If you bail somebody out, you help them out of a difficult situation, often in a way that costs you money. In this case, the taxpayers paid US$200 billion to bail out the two firms in question.
    5. His crimes were extremely anti-social in nature, committed for his sexual appeptite or for the sake of soothing personal anxiety.
    If someone's behavior is anti-social (or antisocial), it is upsetting or irritating to other people; it is in opposition to or disruptive of social order.
    6. The Audit Commission did not spare the rod when it looked over the nutrition and exercise programs of primary school and found things amiss.
    If you spare the rod, you refrain from punishing someone although you have the power and authority to do so. So, if you don't spare the rod, you do punish someone. Incidentally, the use of the phrase spare the rod here is a bit tongue-in-cheek. It is based on a verse in the Bible:

    He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes. –Proverbs 13:24 (KJV)

    In other words, a parent who doesn't discipline a child doesn't really love that child; if a parent loves a child, he or she will discipline that child.

    This is often expressed as "Spare the rod and spoil the child." The original quote is in reference to nutrition and exercise programs in primary schools, and Spare the rod and spoil the child is normally used in reference to children, so....

    Greg

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    #3

    Tongue-in-cheek

    Quote Originally Posted by dragn View Post
    Since it is likely that those with foreign backgrounds have been educated elsewhere, including only those who have been locally educated would exclude the majority of those with foreign backgrounds. Thus, there will be a smaller percentage of people with foreign backgrounds included in the jury pool than may actually exist in the population.
    If a practice or belief flies in the face of something, it seems to operate in opposition or contradiction to it.
    The SEC is the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is an independent government agency that oversees the stock exchanges in the United States and other things related to the trading of securities.
    If you bail somebody out, you help them out of a difficult situation, often in a way that costs you money. In this case, the taxpayers paid US$200 billion to bail out the two firms in question.
    If someone's behavior is anti-social (or antisocial), it is upsetting or irritating to other people; it is in opposition to or disruptive of social order.
    If you spare the rod, you refrain from punishing someone although you have the power and authority to do so. So, if you don't spare the rod, you do punish someone. Incidentally, the use of the phrase spare the rod here is a bit tongue-in-cheek. It is based on a verse in the Bible:

    He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes. –Proverbs 13:24 (KJV)

    In other words, a parent who doesn't discipline a child doesn't really love that child; if a parent loves a child, he or she will discipline that child.

    This is often expressed as "Spare the rod and spoil the child." The original quote is in reference to nutrition and exercise programs in primary schools, and Spare the rod and spoil the child is normally used in reference to children, so....

    Greg
    Hi Greg,

    What does tongue-in-cheek mean?

    Tks /ju


    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 394
    #4

    Re: underrepresented...

    What does tongue-in-cheek mean?
    If we say something is tongue-in-cheek, we basically mean it's meant as a joke; it's sarcastic; it's not meant to be taken seriously. Sometimes a writer makes a subtle or clever reference and then enjoys the fact that perhaps only a certain percentage of people will "get it." We might say that's tongue-in-cheek.

    Greg

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