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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,000
    #1

    broke ground = turn the first sod

    Dear teachers,

    Here is a sentence from an English text where I noted a very strange verbal phrase, namely “break ground”.

    I read in the local paper that you recently broke ground for a new office complex.

    By intuition I made a logical association with the terms “groundbreaking” and “corner stone”.

    Groundbreaking is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project.

    Corner stone = such a stone, often inscribed, laid at a ceremony marking the origin of a building.

    In this way I drew to the conclusion that the phrase “broke ground” = “turn the first sod”.
    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the phrase in question?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2008
    • Posts: 907
    #2

    Re: broke ground = turn the first sod

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Here is a sentence from an English text where I noted a very strange verbal phrase, namely “break ground”.

    I read in the local paper that you recently broke ground for a new office complex.

    By intuition I made a logical association with the terms “groundbreaking” and “corner stone”.

    Groundbreaking is a traditional ceremony in many cultures that celebrates the first day of construction for a building or other project.

    Corner stone = such a stone, often inscribed, laid at a ceremony marking the origin of a building.

    In this way I drew to the conclusion that the phrase “broke ground” = “turn the first sod”.
    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the phrase in question?

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Dear vil:

    Yes, you are correct. In addition, 'to break ground' is commonly used idiomatically. "This newest bio-engineering development is truly groundbreaking," meaning the new development leads the way into an entirely new phase of inquiry and research.

    Best wishes,

    Petra

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