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  1. #1

    peeling a few free

    I wanted to thank you for peeling a few free so I could let this happen.

    Can you figure out what he means in this sentence?
    Is it possible someome gave some of the merchandise for free as a test?

    Thank you


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: peeling a few free

    One of the speakers, A, let B have/sold B 5 automatic AK rifles from A's store of weapons -peeling a few free to sell to B - so B could then sell them to some old guys 'playing capture the flag or something' - some kind of military-style game/acitivity. B is thanking A for agreeing to do it.


    That's my take.

  2. Ouisch's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2006
    • Posts: 4,142
    #3

    Re: peeling a few free

    Or it could refer to money....sometimes people carry large amounts of cash in a "roll," and they "peel" bills off of it.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: peeling a few free

    The idea of 'peeling off a few' from a wad of notes makes perfect sense.
    But look at the actual subtitled dialogue:
    Subtitle preview
    1
    00:00:07,589 --> 00:00:10,032
    You okay selling
    these guys five AKs?

    2
    00:00:10,899 --> 00:00:13,191
    Natey just hangs out
    with these survivalist cats,

    3
    00:00:13,311 --> 00:00:15,461
    bunch of crazy old guys playing...

    4
    00:00:15,617 --> 00:00:18,287
    I don't know,
    capture the flag or something.

    5
    00:00:18,868 --> 00:00:20,418
    I wanted to thank you

    6
    00:00:20,893 --> 00:00:23,122
    for peeling a few free so I could...

    7
    00:00:23,309 --> 00:00:25,570
    - let this happen, huh?
    ...

    If this is similar to the subtitles I saw in my hotel room in Thailand, which at times bore no relation to what was coming out of the actor's mouths...or perhaps there's more context than just this snippet...

    But I much prefer Ouisch's idea: in the real world, this is more likely to relate to a wad of money, than divining some 'urban' 'street' patois.

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