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    • Join Date: Apr 2009
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    #1

    Question numbers before by a noun i.e. 10-year

    what is the rule for the use of numbers before a noun? as in:
    10 year period

    how do we write it?
    10-year period?
    10 years period?
    period of 10 years

    I have been searching the web for hours and nothing!

    thanks everyone!

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    #2

    Re: numbers before by a noun i.e. 10-year

    Hi navinic,

    Use a hyphen and singular form of the measurement.

    A 3-mile journey, a 10-year period, a 12-foot drop, a four-dollar purchase.

    Although "10 years' period" isn't idiomatic, you'd use the possessive otherwise, as in: She gave two weeks' notice.

    This is often written erroneously as "two weeks notice," but see this: https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/a...-articles.html

    With the"of" then it's plural and no apostrophe: A journey of three miles, a period of 10 years, a drop of 12 feet, a purchase of four dollars.


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    #3

    Question Re: numbers before by a noun i.e. 10-year

    is it accurate then if I say

    a 10-year business partner

    should we use "a business partner since (or for) 10 years" instead?

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    #4

    Re: numbers before by a noun i.e. 10-year

    I'd say 'my business partner for ten years' or 'my business partner of ten years'.

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    #5

    Re: numbers before by a noun i.e. 10-year

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I'd say 'my business partner for ten years' or 'my business partner of ten years'.

    If you say the above, then he/she could still be your partner, or the partnership lasted ten years and then it ended.

    If you say "My business partner since 1999" that would indicate the partnership is now 10 years old and still in effect.

    I am not a teacher.

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