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Thread: want

  1. Unregistered
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    #1

    want

    I wonder if there is any difference between (1) and (2).

    (1), I don't want you to get sick.
    (2), I don't want you getting sick.

    Thank you in advance.

  2. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #2

    Re: want

    Both are fine and mean much the same. The first fits coventional grammar patterns.

  3. #3

    Re: want

    Whereas the first sentence seems to be of a more "preventative" point of view, it would seem that the second indicates that the process of "getting sick" has already begun and therefore they don't want you somewhere.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 61,524
    #4

    Re: want

    The second might be used to sound more reassuring and caring, mightn't it?

  5. #5

    Re: want

    Hey, tdol! Absolutely! I guess I hadn't thought of it that way, I was more focused on finding a difference! Anyway, loved the "mightn't"...

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