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  1. cpk011's Avatar
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    #1

    It-That Sentence Structure

    Hi.

    I am a new member although I have been following the discussion on and off with a great interest.

    I have a question.

    "It was not until 1827 [that] the modern type we are familiar with was made."
    In this sentence, is it all right to omit [that]?

    Thanks.

    Peter
    Last edited by cpk011; 28-Apr-2009 at 09:22. Reason: took out blank lines

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: It-That Sentence Structure

    Not really, but a lot of people do.

    b

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: It-That Sentence Structure

    Hi cpk011 and Bob,

    While that doesn't contribute any meaning in [1],
    [1] It was not until 1827 that the modern type we are familiar with was made.
    I wouldn't recommend omitting it. The reason being, that flags an oncoming clause, and not just any clause, but the clause that houses the main point:


    • The modern type we are familiar with wasn't made until 1827.

    Because the main idea is delayed in [1]--pushed to the end of the sentence, it's best to keep that to tell readers and listeners, "Here, now, comes the main point."
    [1] It was not until 1827 the modern type we are familiar with was made. <awkward sounding>

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: It-That Sentence Structure

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Hi cpk011 and Bob,

    While that doesn't contribute any meaning in [1],
    [1] It was not until 1827 that the modern type we are familiar with was made.
    I wouldn't recommend omitting it. The reason being, that flags an oncoming clause, and not just any clause, but the clause that houses the main point:


    • The modern type we are familiar with wasn't made until 1827.

    Because the main idea is delayed in [1]--pushed to the end of the sentence, it's best to keep that to tell readers and listeners, "Here, now, comes the main point."
    [1] It was not until 1827 the modern type we are familiar with was made. <awkward sounding>
    Yes, I'm happy to omit "that" in sentences like your 'The modern type' we were...' one; but with the 'it' construction I feel the sentence needs something to signal 'Here comes what I'm talking about'.

    b

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