Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 519
    #1

    benighted

    Please, I want to know how many morphemes is the word "benighted" consisted of?
    and is this word a base, a stem, or a root?

  2. Monticello's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 455
    #2

    Re: benighted

    Quote Originally Posted by sash2008 View Post
    Please, I want to know how many morphemes is the word "benighted" consisted of?
    and is this word a base, a stem, or a root?
    Hi sash2008,

    Let's first distinguish morphemes from phonemes and graphemes. The first sentence from the wiki article on morphemes does this quite nicely:
    ... a morpheme is the smallest linguistic unit that has semantic meaning. In spoken language, morphemes are composed of phonemes (the smallest linguistically distinctive units of sound), and in written language morphemes are composed of graphemes (the smallest units of written language).
    With this definition in mind, the word benighted consists of three morphemes: (1) be -- a prefix; (2) night -- the root (please see 8. Linguistics); and (3) ed -- a suffix; each of these three "units" carrying its own "semantic meaning."

    Last edited by Monticello; 30-Apr-2009 at 23:45.

  3. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 519
    #3

    Re: benighted

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi sash2008,

    Let's first distinguish morphemes from phonemes and graphemes. The first sentence from the wiki article on morphemes does this quite nicely:
    ... a morpheme is the smallest linguistic unit that has semantic meaning. In spoken language, morphemes are composed of phonemes (the smallest linguistically distinctive units of sound), and in written language morphemes are composed of graphemes (the smallest units of written language).
    With this definition in mind, the word benighted consists of three morphemes: (1) be; (2) night; and (3) ed, each of these three "units" carrying its own "semantic meaning."


    Thank you Mr Monticello for this useful post.
    I agree with you that it has three morphemes, but I get many opinions about this word especially; that there is no verb or no word called benight and that the word benighted is only one morpheme.

  4. Monticello's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2009
    • Posts: 455
    #4

    Re: benighted

    Quote Originally Posted by sash2008 View Post
    Thank you Mr Monticello for this useful post.
    I agree with you that it has three morphemes, but I get many opinions about this word especially; that there is no verb or no word called benight and that the word benighted is only one morpheme.
    Hi sash2008,

    That's why definitions are so important in any discussion. And that's also why, anticipating the possibility for differences of opinions here, I first provided a commonly understood definition taken from an impartial source.

  5. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Nov 2008
    • Posts: 519
    #5

    Re: benighted

    Quote Originally Posted by Monticello View Post
    Hi sash2008,

    That's why definitions are so important in any discussion. And that's also why, anticipating the possibility for differences of opinions here, I first provided a commonly understood definition taken from an impartial source.
    Thank you very much Mr Monticello.
    This word really confused me, but now I get it.
    Thanks a lot.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •