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    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 55
    #1

    doing or undergoing something

    Hello,
    I would like to know whether my assumption about the following
    is right or not:

    If I say "Kenneth had his best friend killed" it means that Kenneth
    asked someone to kill his best friend for him.

    But if I say "Kenneth had his best friend kill for him" it means that Kenneth
    asked his best friend to go and kill someone else.

    So in general, in a sentence like "A had B killed/fired/thrashed..." (when
    I use a past simple for the verbs kill/fire/thrash...) it means that B undergoes something that A set in motion.

    And in a sentence like "A had B kill/fire/thrash C" (when I use a present tense for the verbs kill/fire/thrash...) it means B does something to C because he was told to do so by A.

    Can anyone verify this for me, please?


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 248
    #2

    Re: doing or undergoing something

    Filip,
    You understand, and express, the meanings quite correctly. Just one minor quibble: the verb forms "killed," "fired," "thrashed" are not past tense verbs - they're passive participles. And your "kill," "fire," and "thrash" are not simple present tense verbs - they're what grammarians call "bare" infinitives.
    You write English very well. You'd get an A in my class.


    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 55
    #3

    Re: doing or undergoing something

    Hooray, an A! That means a lot to me, coming from a true English speaking teacher. Thanks very much for confirming my theory and teaching me the correct grammatical terms that came with it.

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