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    #1

    Cleft: It is every week that he comes to see me.

    It is every week that he comes to see me.
    It is almost every week that he comes to see me.
    It was until 11.00 that I worked.

    I know about 'It was not until...' But do you native speakers use cleft sentences for 'every day' , 'until...' etc?

    Thank you in advance.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Cleft: It is every week that he comes to see me.

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    It is every week that he comes to see me.
    It is almost every week that he comes to see me.
    It was until 11.00 that I worked.

    I know about 'It was not until...' But do you native speakers use cleft sentences for 'every day' , 'until...' etc?

    Thank you in advance.
    No, this is not usual. Your sentences sound wrong.
    It was not until 11.00 that I stopped working. = I stopped working at 11.00.
    You can say the following:
    It was only after 11.00 that I stopped working. = It was after 11.00 when I stopped working.
    It is only on Saturdays that he comes to see me. = Saturday is when he comes to see me. = He comes to see me Saturday/ on Saturdays.

    Note that these constructions are used when you are talking to someone who believes otherwise:
    A: Didn't he see you on Monday?
    B: No. It's only on Saturdays that he comes to see me.
    A: Did you stop working at 10.00?
    B: No,
    It was only after 11.00 that I stopped working. The sentences are expressed this way to emphasise the first part, which differs from what is supposed by the hearer. In most cases, you would simply say: He comes to see me on Saturdays. If there is no previous context suggesting otherwise, a cleft sentence often sounds strange, and is never really needed in conversation.
    In literature, or in longer sentences, the following is possible:
    It was a on dark and windy night that the stranger came knocking at the door. = It was a dark and windy night when the stranger came knocking at the door. This is merely for poetic effect.
    Others might have a different opinion. Your sentences are not grammatically wrong, just strange.

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