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  1. #1

    Strengthend-smoothness?

    Hi,

    I formulate an adjective from this context:

    Let us consider the data whose smoothness is strengthened.

    Now I paraphrase this sentence as follows:

    Let us consider the strengthened-smoothness data.

    Please let me know if strengthened-smoothness can be an adjective with such formulation.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    Anything that modifies a noun can be an adjective, when used in this way. The hyphens help us to see the adjectival position. For example, you could talk about the car-bicycle ratio in a city. Car and bicycle are both nouns, but used this way, they form an adjective modifying ratio.

    My only objection to your construction is the inconsistency of combining the words strengthened (which is an adjective in its own right) and smoothness (which is a noun). To combine them is inconsistent. I would prefer to see strength-smoothness data or strengthened-smoothed data in combination this way.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    Let us consider the data whose smoothness is strengthened.

    Aren't you confusing 'smoothing' of data (which can still leave missing data values); and strengthening the data, so that when then 'smoothed', fewer data points are missing.

    The idea of 'strengthened-smoothness' therefore, doesn't make sense: you don't strengthen the 'smoothness', but the data.

    You seem to be referring to "...the strengthened, smoothed data..."

  2. #4

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    Thank you very much for your suggestions.

    In this case, I meant I strengthen the smoothness of the data, the number of data is certainly stable.

    I have seen on Google "strengthened smoothness conditions" was used. Is it similar to my case?

    Thanks


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #5

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    You are trying to apply a concept from the mathematics related to curvature of space, as a description for 'strengthening of data' + 'the statistical smoothing of data', where real numbers are employed.

  3. #6

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    You are trying to apply a concept from the mathematics related to curvature of space, as a description for 'strengthening of data' + 'the statistical smoothing of data', where real numbers are employed.
    Yes. Is it ok?


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #7

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    NO.
    What is happening in the realms of pure mathematics in "strengthened smoothness conditions" is NOT the same as the statistical manipulation of real numbers. With curves, the 'smoothness' is referring to actual curvature.
    'Smoothing' of data is the process whereby two sets of data having different standard deviations and means are brought into alignment:
    14 year old boys: Mean = 10 S.D. = 3
    10 year old boys: Mean = 8 S.D. = 4
    Eye-balling the data shows that 14 year old perform better on the test. Yet at 2 S.Ds., 14 year olds would need a score of 16...and that at 2 S.Ds., a 10 year old would also have a score of 16. Since the test is harder for 10 year olds, we would anticipate that 10 year olds would attain two S.Ds.with a score something like 14, not 16. It is an anomaly, suggesting that bright 10 year olds are just as clever as bright 14 year olds!?!
    Either the data needs strengthening by adding new items to the test, or the data will need to be 'smoothed' to compensate for the difference in the variances for the test performance.
    As I mentioned, if you want the shortest way of expressing it, then:
    "...the strengthened, smoothed data..."

    ....and I don't really like that!
    Last edited by David L.; 06-May-2009 at 03:29.

  4. #8

    Re: Strengthend-smoothness?

    Hi David L.,

    Thank you very much for your clear explanation.

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