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  1. VIP Member
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    #1

    Question to be better off

    Hi,

    I was wondering if I could say: "I will be better off doing gardening than singing." Isn't it more idiomatic than saying "Taking gardening classes will be a better choice for me than singing classes."

    Thank your for information and corrections.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to be better off

    Slightly more idiomatic, yes.

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    #3

    Question Re: to be better off

    Hi, me again,

    “I chose garderning over singing”.

    First: Is it idiomatic in English to say it that way? Second: Does the sentence above express the same idea as the one in the first posting?

    Corrections are welcomed.

    Thanks!

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to be better off

    Yes.

  5. VIP Member
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    #5

    Re: to be better off

    Short but sweet. Thank you!


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    #6

    Re: to be better off

    "I will be better off doing gardening than singing."
    This suggests you have done the arithmetic and will be better off financially if you become a gardener.

    The idiomatic expression is:
    "I would be better off doing gardening than singing."
    This might mean financially and/or job prospects and/or other reasons as well.

    “I chose garderning over singing”.
    This merely states the fact, the decision you made. In contrast to being "better off" which is clearly stated in the first sentence, the speaker might then say, "It was the worst decision I ever made."
    That is, in the second sentence, we don't know whether the speaker is feeling positive or negative about the decision made. And in contrast to having made the decision in the second sentence, the first sentence implies you have been weighing up the pros and cons prior to making a decision, but appear to be opting for gardening.

  6. VIP Member
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    #7

    Re: to be better off

    The meaning is slightly different but it makes a difference that count. Thanks!

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